HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

DAY.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

DAY is the northwest corner town of the county. It is bounded, north, by Warren Co.; east, by Hadley; south, by Corinth and Edinburgh; west, by Edinburgh and by Hamilton county. It comprises a territory of an irregular rhomboidal form, about eight miles in length from north to south, and having an average width of the same distance from east to west. It includes 9534 acres of improved land, 9728 of unimproved, and of this last amount 9416 is woodland. The population in 1875 was 1199.

The town of Day is mostly within the boundaries of Palmer's purchase, the southwestern corner running into the patent granted to John Glen and forty-four others.

The following description of the town of Day, and the definition of its boundary lines, is taken from the revised statutes of the State:

"The town of Day shall contain all that part of said county, beginning at the east corner of the farm of Walter Hunt, on the north bank of the west branch of the Hudson river, and running from thence north thirty degrees and forty minutes west to the rear line of the river division of Palmer's Purchase; then along the said rear line westerly until it intersects the west bounds of the county; then along the said west bounds of the county, northerly, to the north bounds of the county; then along the same until a course of south thirty degrees and forty minutes east will strike the most northerly corner of lot No. 50, in Palmer's Purchase; then south thirty degrees and forty minutes east, to and along the easterly bounds of the lot marked H.T.P. to the said corners of the said lot No. 50; then along the east bounds of said lot to the Sacandaga river; then on a course that will strike the east bounds of lot No. 3, in the subdivision of the twenty-fourth allotment of the Kayadrossera patent; then south along the said east bounds to the town of Corinth; then west along the bounds of Corinth to the west corner thereof; and thence to the place of beginning."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The Sacandaga river enters at its southwest corner, and flows in a tortuous northeast by east course across it. The Kayadrossera range of mountains are in the southern part of the town, and the part north of the river is occupied by high hills. There are three small lakes, called Mud, Sand, and Livingston lakes. Livingston lake lies in the northeastern part of the town, and empties its waters through Paul creek into the Sacandaga at Day Centre. Sand lake lies near the centre of the northern half of the town, and empties through the creek of the same name into the river, near the town line. Mud lake is near the north line of the town, and two miles east of the western boundary. It empties into the Sacandaga in Hamilton county. There are many high peaks among the hills. Oak and Bald mountains reach an elevation of nine hundred feet above the river. Rockwell's mountain, near Day Centre, is a stony elevation of some seven hundred feet, and affords a fine view up the valley. From the hills back of Huntsville a beautiful view of the valley, the Mayfield mountains, and the distant Catskills is obtained, and from other hills the Green mountains of Vermont show plainly in clear weather. The soil is sandy, and filled with outcropping rocks.

The principal streams are Sand, Paul, Glasshouse, Daly, and Allen's creeks, and the lakes lying in Corinth, and the outlet of a number of small lakes lying in Corinth.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlers within the present town of Day, of whom anything definite can be learned, came about the year 1797. David Johnson was born in New Hampshire, in 1758, and enlisted in the American army in 1776, being then eighteen years old. He served seven years, and took part in the campaign against the Tories and Indians in 1779, under the command of General Sullivan. At the expiration of his term of service he went to Salisbury, Vt., and soon after married Mary Joiner. In 1797, with his wife and seven children, he started for the "Genesee country," with the expectation of settling on some of the rich and fertile lands he had seen in his campaign under Sullivan. He had his household and effects in a large, covered sleigh, and came across the mountains to Luzerne. Then crossed the Hudson, and struck into a roughly-broken forest-path that crossed the hills and came into the Sacandaga valley a little above Conklingville. The snow, which had been quite deep all winter, now suddenly melted away and left him and his family stranded. He concluded to try farming, and bought a farm in what is known as the Rockwell neighborhood. He lived there one year, and finding the title defective, and the land being claimed by another man, he left the farm, refusing to treat with the claimant, saying he would "never buy such land twice," and, going east, bought three hundred acres on the eastern boundary of the town, fronting on the river, running back three hundred rods. He built a log house where Kathan's hotel now stands in 1798, and lived there many years. He died Feb. 22, 1839, and lies buried in the Craig burying-ground, between Conklingville and Day Centre. His family consisted of eight children, - six girls and two boys. Of these children but one remained in Day. John remained on the homestead. He served in the War of 1812, and was at Plattsburg. He married Fally Allen, a daughter of David Allen, about 1815, and had a family of thirteen children. Of these Luke and Philadelphus were drowned while driving logs in the river - the first at the falls of Luzerne, the other at Wellstown. Louisa Totman and Mary L. Scott, two of the daughters, live in West Day. John S. lives in Edinburgh, about a mile and a half west of Huntsville. David lives on the old homestead. These are all of the grandchildren of David Johnson that are now living in Saratoga County.

Jonas Bond and Phineas Austin were brothers-in-law, and settled on the north side of the river, about a mile east of Day Centre, in 1797 or 1798. They were hunters and trappers, and, by the dexterous use of line, trap, and gun, kept the larder supplied and the wardrobe replenished.

A family by the name of Grove are reported to have settled here previous to 1799.

In the early spring of 1799, Nicholas Flansburgh, a resident of Schenectady county, came - via the Fish House (Northampton) - down the river in a dugout, and, landing on the south bank of the river, nearly opposite Day Centre, settled on lot 3, great lot 21 of the John Glen patent. He built a log house, and clearing up the land as quickly as possible, planted his crops. Wild animals were quite plentiful at that time. The deer had a herding-place or yard at a large rock on the hill near Mr. Flansburgh's. Bears were frequently seen, and sometimes, grown bold by pressing hunger, would come and carry off a calf, sheep, or pig, and often the poor settler, lacking powder and ball, was forced to see his property destroyed without remedy. Sometimes the tables were turned, and Bruin himself helped to fill the meat-barrel. The barking of foxes and the howling of wolves were frequent, and the blood-curdling shriek of the panther was occasionally heard.

George Bradford, with his mother and three sisters, came from the shire of Galway, North Britain, and settled in the eastern part of the town of Day, in the year 1800. The mother, Mary Bradford, died in 1804, aged seventy-five years, and was buried in what was afterwards known as the Craig burying-ground. Her burial was probably the first one in the town. The Bradfords did not keep a regular tavern, but their log hut was often used by travelers who desired refreshment and shelter. It is said that the board, on one side of which the ladies of the household kneaded their "rye and Indian" loaves, was so arranged that the man of the house used the other side for the purpose of shaving "navy plug" into the proper form and condition for consumption. At last the keen edge of the knife wore away the substance of the board and made its debut on the bread side, and from that hour the usefulness of the board as a "double-header" was ended. Bradford married Betsy Sumner, a daughter of John Sumner, Sr. His sister, Mary, married Wm. Craig, and they built and kept the first tavern in the town about 1802 or 1803.

About this time a quite remarkable character settled on the lot west of what is now called the Stimson homestead. His name was Daniel Hines. In his youth he was captured by the Indians, and was brought up among them, adopting their ways, manner, and dress. He built a log cabin, dressed in Indian costume, with moccasins, fringed leggings, wampum and eagle plumes, carried his bow and arrows, knife and tomahawk, lived by the fruits of the chase, and was to all practical intents and purposes a veritable aborigine. He was quite a terror to the children of the vicinity, who, when perverse and fretful, were threatened with a visitation from "Indian Hines," which dire threat usually produced a sudden, though perhaps but temporary reformation. The friendly wayside bushes have often screened the trembling forms of the little ones while the dread and redoubtable chieftain strode majestically along, and many little hearts beat less wildly as he vanished in the distance.

Samuel Rogers settled in Day Centre, about 1800. His house stood about opposite where Guile's hotel now stands. His barn was on the present hotel site. Religious services were held in this barn by "Preacher" Clark at a very early date, - probably about 1803. Peter Van Vleck moved on to this farm about 1805, and services were then held in the house. Rogers had three daughters, one of whom married Daniel Hines.

Wm. Woolley settled near "Cook's Ferry," a little west of S.Y. Rockwell's present residence, in 1804. After living there a few years, he returned to his former home in Schenectady.

Henry Paul came from Guilford, Vt., in 1801, and settled near the mouth of the creek which bears his name. He built the first mill in this section about the year 1805. It was a small saw- and grist-mill. There was a plank which led from the roadside to its door, and when the door was reached a person of ordinary height had to bow low to enter. Before this mill was built the inhabitants were obliged to put their grists into a dug-out and go up the river some distance above the Fish House to get them ground. On the site of the old mill there is a mill now standing, owned by a grandson and namesake of Henry Paul. Matthew Flansburgh came from Guilderland, Albany county, in 1802, and settled on lot 35 of the Glen and Yates patent. There were but few settlers, no roads, and an almost unbroken forest. After clearing a sufficient space he planted his crops and waited for the harvest. The following winter he went to Schenectady, a distance of forty miles, on foot after a half-bushel of salt, which he brought back on his shoulder. He came from Albany via Schenectady, Fish House, and Beecher's Hollow. He had six children, four of whom are still living in this county. Peter, the oldest, lives in Day, aged eighty-four years. Catharine Mosher lives in Day; William H. lives in Hadley, and John in Ballston. A grandson, Isaac J. Flansburgh, has a very pleasant home at Day Centre, on a portion of the old homestead. To him we are indebted for valuable aid in collecting the materials for this work. Philip Fraker settled in Day as early as 1802, a little west of the Stimson place. One of his granddaughters is living in Edinburgh, Mrs. James Partridge. There are many of the name living in Day and Edinburgh, most of whom it is presumed are relatives and descendants of Philip Fraker.

David Allen was another settler of 1802. He came from the town of Providence; was formerly from Providence, Rhode Island. He settled on a farm of one hundred acres, about one and a half miles west of Conklingville, and lived there, and with his son-in-law, Luke Kathan, till he died, in 1871. He had a family of seven girls and three boys. Two of the daughters, Mrs. Phoebe Palmer and Mrs. Freelove Kathan, are living in Day. In the year 1803, Joseph Rockwell, a young man of twenty-three, came into Day, with his father and brothers, and settled on the west half of lot 56, Glen and Yates patent. He remained here till 1805, when he returned to Vermont, where he remained a short time, and then came back to Day and lived the rest of his life on the farm now occupied by his eldest son, Samuel Y. Rockwell, Esq. He died in 1857, aged seventy-seven years. Two sons, Samuel Y. and George F., and one daughter, Mrs. Emily Yates, are living in Day. Samuel Y. married Abigail Weston; had a family of nine children, but one of whom is now living. She resides with her parents on the old homestead.

Portrait of S.Y. Rockwell

Thomas Yates was a brass-founder in Staffordshire, near Birmingham, England, and came to America in 1801. After working two years in New Fork and one year in Schenectady, he came to Day Centre in the fall of 1804. Being a pretty well educated man, he was prevailed upon to teach a school during the winter of 1804-5, which he did. The school was kept in a room in his own house, and he had four scholars. Two of these scholars, Peter and Gertrude Flansburgh, are still living, one in Day, the other in Schenectady. He married Abigail Paul in 1805, and this was one of the first (if not the first) marriages in Day. He bought thirty acres of land, on lot 36, near Henry Paul's. Of his children five are living in Day, viz., John, Joseph, Leonard, and William Yates, and Mrs. Louisa Flansburgh. Leonard runs a saw-mill and broom-handle factory on Paul creek. William lives on the homestead. Eliphaz Day, after whom the town was named, came to the town in 1805. He was an active, stirring, energetic business man, and immediately began lumbering. Forming the acquaintance of Sophia Rockwell, he became a suitor for her hand, and being accepted they were married. They had six children: Lydia, Ann, Nancy, Eliphaz M., Elizabeth, and Truman. None of them are living in this vicinity. Of the descendants of Eliphaz Day, only grandchildren are living in this section.

Eliphaz Day was a noted lumber-dealer. He had the fine pines of the Sacandaga valley cut, drawn to the river, floated them down to the lower falls of the Hudson, there made them into huge rafts and floated them down with the tide, tying to the shore during the flood, and floating down with the ebb tides. Once he had a large raft of beautiful pine logs that covered between two and three acres of surface. Arriving at New York, by some accident or miscalculation they failed to make fast to the piers, and the tide going out, was fast drifting them out to sea, where the waves would have soon broken up the huge mass of logs, and not only would the timber have been lost, but also the lives of those on the raft. By shouts and gesticulations they made their critical situation known, and a steam-tug soon put them safe alongside the wharf. Some one asked Day if, had the raft been lost, it would not have "broke" him? He replied that he didn't know, but thought it would have bent him terribly. At the time of his death, April 19, 1827, he was engaged in driving logs at the "horse-race," near Conklingville, and attempted to pass down the river in a boat. It is supposed a floating log or hidden rock broke one of his oars, or knocked it from his grasp, the boat became unmanageable, upset, and he was drowned. He was buried in the Craig burying-ground.

Samuel Stimson, Jr., married Mehitabel Ellithorp, a daughter of Azariah Ellithorp, in Edinburgh, January 1, 1803. In April, 1805, he removed to Day and bought a farm of a Mr. Wight. It was on lot 39, Glen and Yates patent. Here he lived and raised a family of six boys and three girls. Mrs. Abby A. Randall lives on the homestead. Solomon L., Samuel L., and John F. Stimson live in Day. Mrs. Mary E. Baker lives in Day. Mrs. Susan M. Copeland lives in Edinburgh. The nearest post-office at the time Mr. Stimson settled here was at Waterford. Letters were expected about once a year. The postage was twenty-five cents, and seldom prepaid. Correspondence in those days was a slow, solemn, and serious business. Mr. Stimson kept the first blacksmith-shop in Day. It was located on the flat, a little east of the house.

Palmer, Wells, Backus, Ward, Wight, Joseph Kellogg, Wm. Huxley, Moses Hayden, John Perry, Wm. Colson, James Thomas, and Mr. Clay were other early settlers.

In 1848 a bounty of ten dollars was offered for every full-grown panther or wolf killed in the town.

The Craig house, on the site of William Aldrich's present residence, was the first frame house built in Day. Sanders' mill, on Daly's creek, was built about 1808 or 1810. Thaddeus Scribner was the first mail-carrier in this section. In 1821 or 1822 his route was from Ballston through Greenfield, Corinth, Hadley, Day, Edinburgh, Providence, and Galway to Ballston. He followed an old Indian trail that ran from Albany through this section, and crossed the Sacandaga at what was called Huntoon's rift.

Joseph Rockwell was first postmaster. The office was at his house. He served some thirty-five years, and was succeeded by his son, Samuel Y., who held it several years.

Portraits of Luke Kathan and Wife

The Kathan family, who are quite prominent in business and social circles, originally came from Dummerton, Vermont. Luke Kathan, a son of Charles and Lydia Kathan, came from that place to Day in 1822; bought lands and commenced farming on the place now occupied by his son Truman. In 1823 he married Freelove Allen, a daughter of David Allen. They have had a family of fifteen children, six sons and nine daughters, all of whom reached maturity and were married. Twelve are still living. Truman, Orange, Hugh W., Harmon R., James D., Mrs. Mary Wait, and Mrs. Alvina Ellithorp live in Day. Mrs. Caroline Frasure lives in Edinburgh. Mrs. Sarah Wait lives in Michigan. Mrs. Betsey Huntoon and Mrs. Anna Wait live in Canada. Monroe lives in Hadley.

Abner Wait moved from Rhode Island to Saratoga County in 1790. He first settled in Galway, but afterwards removed to Day, near the East Day church. He died in 1830. None of his children are living. His son, Abner, Jr., married Sally Johnson about 1810. He died in 1850. His family consisted of eleven children, - eight sons and three daughters. Six sons and two daughters are still living. One of these, John J. Wait, lives on a very fine farm, on the north side of the Sacandaga, in Hadley, and is the present supervisor of that town.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

Name. - This town was erected April 17, 1819, from the towns of Hadley and Edinburgh, and was named Concord. It being afterwards discovered that there was already a town in the State bearing that name, it was thought advisable to change it, and it was called Day, in honor of its most prominent citizen and business man, Eliphaz Day, who had died in April previous to this action.

The first town-meeting was held in the spring of 1820, and Eliphaz Day was elected supervisor. The records of the town were burned in 1847, and we are unable to give a full account of its early civil and political history.

 

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LIST OF TOWN-OFFICERS.

 

Supervisor.

Town Clerk.

Collector.

1820.

Eliphaz Day.

Record lost.

Record lost.

1821.

"

"

"

1822.

"

"

"

1823.

"

"

"

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

"

"

"

1826.

"

"

"

1827.

Stephen Lawson.

"

"

1828.

"

"

"

1829.

Samuel Stimson.

"

"

1830.

"

"

"

1831.

"

"

"

1832.

"

"

"

1833.

"

"

Samuel Y. Rockwell.

1834.

"

"

"

1835.

George Hunt.

"

No record.

1836.

Amos Lawton.

"

"

1837.

"

"

Wilber Paul.

1838.

James L. Delong.

"

"

1839.

Eliphaz M. Day.

"

George Baker.

1840.

"

"

Asa Deming (2d).

1841.

"

"

No record.

1842.

"

"

Gordon Dimick.

1843.

Zopher I. Delong.

"

Luke Kathan.

1844.

"

"

J.G. Flansburgh.

1845.

"

"

David Wait.

1846.

"

"

Jesse Howe.

1847.

"

Gordon Dimick.

Joseph Rockwell.

1848.

John J. Wait.

"

"

1849.

Sam.l Y. Rockwell.

George Baker.

Perry G. Hall.

1850.

"

Gordon Dimick.

Joseph Rockwell.

1851.

"

Warren A. Randall.

"

1852.

"

"

Gordon Dimick.

1853.

"

H.C. Palmer.

P.L. Johnson.

1854.

"

"

Gordon Dimick.

1855.

"

Warren A. Randall.

Ellery S. Allen.

1856.

George Baker.

William Scott.

Jesse Howe.

1857.

Saml. Y. Rockwell.

"

"

1858.

Zopher I. Delong.

"

"

1859.

"

Isaac N. Scott.

Asa Deming (2d).

1860.

Peter V. Fraker.

"

Solomon H. Bloss.

1861.

"

"

W.W. Rockwell.

1862.

Isaac N. Scott.

John F. Stimson.

"

1863.

"

James O. Paul.

Lewis E. Wait.

1864.

Saml. Y. Rockwell.

Hiram Deming.

"

1865.

"

"

Chas. L. Marcellus.

1866.

"

"

"

1867.

"

"

John S. Perry.

1868.

Isaac N. Scott.

"

F.E. Rockwell.

1869.

Hiram Deming.

Edgar L. Deming.

Erastus Darling.

1870.

F.G. Macomber.

"

"

1871.

"

Erastus Darling.

Thomas Allen.

1872.

"

"

Aug. P. Flansburg.

1873.

"

Edgar L. Deming.

"

1874.

Erastus Darling.

"

"

1875.

Irving W. Guiles.

Thomas D. Yates.

O.R. Deming.

1876.

Erastus Darling.

George F. Paul.

Henry S. Michaels.

1877.

"

Charles Vanavery.

Aug. P. Flansburgh.

1878.

Isaac N. Scott.

Hiram Darling.

John Stead.

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1845.

John Yates.

1862.

Thomas Frost.

1846.

Anthony Allen.

1863.

P.L. Johnson.

1847.

Samuel Y. Rockwell.

1864.

George Baker, long term.

William Scott, short "

1848.

Zopher I. Delong.

1865.

Hezekiah Smith, full term.

A. Allen, long vacancy.

S.Y. Rockwell, short ".

1849.

John Yates.

1866.

"

1850.

Anthony Allen, long term.

George Baker, short ".

1867.

J.S. Johnson, full term.

S.Y. Rockwell, l. vacancy.

J.S. Johnson, s. ".

1851.

Samuel Y. Rockwell.

1868.

Charles L. Marcellus.

1852.

George Baker.

1869.

John Fay Stimson.

1853.

Joseph A. King.

1870.

S.Y. Rockwell, long term.

John J. Wait, short ".

1854.

William Wait.

1871.

Calvin Allen, long term.

S.Y. Rockwell, short ".

1855.

John J. Wait.

1872.

Charles L. Marcellus.

1856.

Samuel Y. Rockwell.

1873.

George Baker.

1857.

Joseph A. King.

1874.

S.Y. Rockwell, long term.

J. Fay Stimson, short ".

1858.

George Baker, long term.

L.H. Frasure, short ".

1875.

Seth Aldrich.

1859.

"

1876.

Warren A. Randall.

1860.

S.Y. Rockwell, long term.

Z.I. Delong, short ".

1877.

J.M. Perqua.

1861.

Hezekiah Smith, long term.

S.Y. Rockwell, short ".

1878.

Samuel Y. Rockwell.

 

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V. - VILLAGES AND HAMLETS.

There are two small villages in this town, and part of the village of Conklingville also lies within its limits. Huntsville is a little village about half a mile east of the west town line, and consists of some twenty dwellings, two stores, one blacksmith-shop, one wagon-shop, one clothes-pin factory, one hotel, a school-house, and a church. Day Centre is a small hamlet a little south of the centre of the town. It comprises about a dozen dwellings, one store, one hotel, one blacksmith-shop, one school-house, and two churches. Just north of it is a saw- and grist-mill, on Paul creek.

Huntsville was named from the sign on the tavern, in 1835, after Amos Hunt. Three brothers, Walter, George, and Ziba Hunt, came to West Day in 1817. Amos Hunt was a son of Walter. George Hunt built the first store in 1835, and it was occupied by his son Charles. The first house in Huntsville was built in 1822 or 1823, by a man named Owens, and was used for an inn for several years.

The wooden-ware shop was built in 1869 by Isaac N. Scott. It is now used as a saw-mill and clothes-pin factory.

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Croweville is a little hamlet on Sand creek, about three and a half miles from its mouth. It has about a dozen dwellings, one tannery, and not far from ninety inhabitants. The tannery, which is in the "Village," was built by William Fowler, in 1856, and sold to Crowe and Kyne, in 1859. In 1865 it was bought by Henry Poor & Son, of Boston, who are present owners. It is under the supervision of Lewis E. Wait. It employs about twenty hands, uses eight thousand hides yearly, and turns out an annual product of one hundred and forty tons of sole-leather, valued at $60,000. The buildings are about fifty-two by three hundred feet, and two stories high. The power is furnished by one twelve-horse central-discharge water-wheel and one sixty-horse engine with four boilers. It uses about fifteen hundred cords of bark yearly.

In the fall of 1825 a dam was built across the Sacandaga at the mouth of Bell brook, and a saw-mill was built about twenty rods above the present bridge, on the north bank of the river. The water was conveyed to this mill through a small canal. Eliphaz Day, Abner Wait, and John Johnson were the owners. The dam flooded the flats and caused considerable litigation, the fall was insufficient, and finally the dam was torn out in 1828, and, with the mill, moved down the stream into the town of Hadley.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

The first school-house in Day was built about 1814. Amos Lawton taught in it two winters, and was teaching a third term, when, in 1817-18, the school-house was burned. He took his school to a vacant room in Henry Paul's house and taught out the term. This school-house stood near where the Presbyterian church now stands. The mound near it marks the spot where the school-house chimney stood. Sally Copeland, Esther Beebee, and Mrs. Susan Huntoon were among the early teachers. A teacher named Fundy taught an early school in a log house on the flat, below Warren A. Randall's. "Preacher" Clark and Laura Wells also taught there before 1808. After the old schoolhouse burned a new frame building was erected on the lot east of the present school-house. Here school was kept from 1818 until the present house was built, in 1868.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT FOR 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

60

$52.14

$41.27

$49.46

$2.00

$144.87

" 2

35

52.14

24.07

22.11

1.17

99.49

" 3

50

52.14

34.39

37.38

1.67

125.58

" 4

38

52.14

26.14

31.74

1.27

111.29

" 5

55

52.14

37.83

31.87

1.83

123.67

" 6

24

52.14

16.51

25.53

.80

94.98

" 7

33

52.14

22.69

24.23

1.10

100.16

" 8

63

52.14

43.33

28.55

2.10

125.62

" 9

56

52.14

38.51

35.86

1.87

128.38

" 10

19

52.14

13.07

13.36

.63

79.20

" 11

86

52.14

59.15

51.73

2.87

165.89

 

519

$573.54

$356.96

$351.82

$17.31

$1299.13

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

In 1812, or about that time, Elder Simmonds organized a Baptist society in Day. He and Daniel Corey preached at school-houses and private houses for several years. No church was ever built, and the society at last broke up and became extinct.

Rev. Mr. Wellman, a Methodist minister, used to preach in Daniel Hines' house as early as 1807.

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REFORMED PROTESTANT DUTCH CHURCH OF DAY.

Rev. Andrew Yates, D.D., in accordance with the instructions of the classis of Schenectady of the Reformed Protestant Dutch church, organized a society of the members of that denomination in Day Centre, on the 14th of November, 1842. The infant church consisted of nine members, viz.: John B. and Betsey Yates, Wilber Paul, Warren A. and Abby A. Randall, Samuel and Mehitabel Stimson, Ann Yates, and Susan M. Armstrong. A consistory was chosen consisting of Samuel Stimson and Warren A. Randall, elders; John B. Yates and Wilber Paul, deacons. At a meeting held May 12, 1844, Rev. Andrew Yates, Samuel Stimson, and Thomas Yates were elected as a building committee, with instructions to build a church edifice, and with full powers to make purchases and contracts in the name of the society. The church was commenced immediately, and the church was finished the same summer with the exception of the inside work, which was but temporary, and has since been changed. The church was dedicated in the fall of the same year.

The society, from its organization till the new church was completed, was ministered to by Revs. Andrew Yates and R.A. Avery, who held occasional services in the schoolhouse during that time. The church was built of cut stone, is about twenty-eight by forty-five feet square, surmounted by a square belfry with a railing above that. The bell was donated by the citizens of the vicinity, who raised the necessary funds by subscription. The total cost of the edifice was about $3000. Upon the completion of the church the Board of Domestic Missions of the Reformed Presbyterian Dutch church installed Rev. J.A. Lansing as the settled pastor of the church, which relation to the church he maintained until the spring of 1848, when he terminated his pastorate and removed to Bethlehem, N.Y. From that time the church was served in a ministerial capacity by the following pastors: Rev. Mr. Raymond, Rev. Mr. Meade, Rev. I.N. Voorhies, Rev. W.L. James.

In 1855, Rev. Calvin Case became the pastor, and served till 1857, in the spring of which year he closed his labors. He was the last pastor of the Reformed Protestant Dutch church. For the next ten years there were no regular meetings, although Rev. Isaac Devoe and others held occasional services during that time. In June, 1867, a meeting of the society was held to consider the desirability of changing its form and ecclesiastical relations, and it was decided to change the society into a Presbyterian church, and to connect it with the presbytery of Albany. The following officers were then chosen to form the session of the new church, viz.: For elders, Warren A. Randall, Joseph Yates, and Isaac J. Flansburgh. The ministers who have preached since the change are Rev. David Edgar, Rev. George Craig, Rev. Robert Ennis, Rev. Robert Gibson, Rev. John D. Countermine. In 1876, Rev. George Bell was made stated supply, and remains in that capacity at present. The present trustees are Leonard Yates, John King, George D. Yates, Irving W. Guiles, Erastus Darling.

The list of elders from the first organization till the present comprises the following names: Samuel Stimson, Warren A. Randall, Thomas Yates, John Yates, Arden T. Fraker, Joseph Yates, and Isaac J. Flansburgh. The deacons were John B. Yates, Wilber Paul, Aaron Truax, Arden T. Fraker, and Joseph Yates.

There has always been a Sunday-school connected with the church, and generally quite prosperous in its condition. At present the average attendance is fifty. The officers are Joseph Yates, superintendent; Mrs. Louisa Flansburgh, assistant superintendent; Mrs. I.W. Guiles, secretary and treasurer. The library contains about three hundred volumes.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF DAY CENTRE.

In October, 1865, a Methodist Episcopal class was formed at Day Centre. It comprised the following names: J.A. Savage, William and Elizabeth Van Avery, Isaac and Catherine Havens, L. and Ellen Kinzy, Warren and Mila Bloss, Eliza Paul, Sarah Queeny, Rosanna Akley, Lois Perry, Antoinette Bloss, Joseph Wells, William Edmonds, Nelson and Frank G. De Golia.

The church, a plain wooden structure, about thirty by forty feet in size, was erected in the fall of 1868 and dedicated in the following winter. It cost about $2200. The present membership is thirty-seven. The trustees are Daniel Lyon, Smith Clark, Hiram Darling, William Yates, and William Van Avery. The stewards are Warren Bloss and Uriah C. Buck.

A Sabbath-school has been held in connection with the church most of the time since its organization till 1876.

Revs. J.K. Wagner, C.T.S. Spear, Hiram Chase, H.D. Morris, E.M. Howe, A. H. Honsinger, George Farrington, John Sumner, E.L. Arnold, and H.H. Smith have been the ministers in charge.

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FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF DAY.

At a meeting of the Christian citizens of the eastern part of the town of Day, held in the school-house near the Kathan homestead on the 18th of November, 1833, Elder H.V. Teal organized a society with the above name, announcing that they took the Scriptures as their only guide, and recognizing Christian character and belief as the only qualifications for membership. The following-named persons subscribed their names to the church-roll, viz.: Isaiah Canon, John and Sylvia Baker, Seth F. and Susannah Huntoon, Sally Wait, James Fraker, and Susannah Allen.

Services were held in the school-house during the next thirteen years until, in 1846, a hoard of trustees, consisting of Edward Scovil, John J. Wait, and Luke Kathan, were elected and instructed to build a church, thirty by forty-four feet, with a vestibule across the front and a gallery above it, from sixteen to twenty-feet posts, and a suitable belfry. It was also declared that the church was free to all denominations when not in use by the society.

The church was built during the fall of 1845 and the winter following, and was completed in the spring and occupied for religious meetings. It cost about $1000. David Wait served as clerk for many years.

The following is as complete a list of the pastors as we have been able to obtain: Rev. Elias Sloat, Rev. William B. Haight, Rev. W.B.H. Beach, Rev. Charles J. Butler, Rev. J. Pratt, Rev. J.F. Wade, Rev. E. Tyler, Rev. R.B. Eldridge.

John Baker, Oliver Baker, Samuel Washburn, Edward Scovil, Abner D. Wait, John J. Wait, and Lewis Gray have served in the capacity of deacons, the two last named holding that office at present.

Since its organization about two hundred and twenty persons have been members of this church. Of this number there have been dismissed by letter twenty-seven; removed, eleven; withdrawn, five; expelled, six; died, twenty-five; disfellowshipped, dropped, and otherwise disposed of, sixty-eight; leaving seventy-eight as the present membership.

A Sunday-school, with an average of about fifty scholars, is connected with the church. They have a small library. Lewis Gray, superintendent, and Truman Kathan, assistant superintendent, are the present officers.

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SECOND CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF DAY, AFTERWARDS CALLED THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF WEST DAY.

Dec. 19, 1857, a meeting was held in the school-house in West Day to organize a society of the Christian denomination. Rev. Elias Sloat and Rev. Latham Coffin, members of the New York Eastern Conference, were present and instituted the church.

The following were the original members: Eugene, Electa and Fatima Frost, Harvey C. and Lydia A. Palmer, Samuel and Betsey Fulton, Philo Colson, Orlando Herrick, Lucy Greenslete, Barbara Scott, Hannah Van Vleck, and Mary A. Deuel.

Eugene Frost was elected to the office of deacon, and Harvey C. Palmer was chosen clerk of the society. Rev. Elias Sloat was first pastor, and was followed by Revs. W.B.H. Beach, Charles I. Butler, J. Pratt, E. Tyler, J.F. Wade, and R.B. Eldridge, who is the present pastor.

The church, which is a plain, neat-looking structure, was commenced in 1861, but was not finished till the fall of 1865. In December of that year it was formally dedicated, Rev. W.B.H. Beach preaching the dedicatory sermon. The church cost about $2000. H.C. Palmer, Isaac N. Scott, and Samuel Fulton were the first board of trustees. Previous to the organization of the church, religious meetings had been held occasionally at the school-house for a number of years.

The first Sunday-school was organized by Dennis Holcomb, and was held in the old school-house. A flourishing Sunday-school is now connected with the church. R.B. Eldridge is superintendent; A.M. Lawrence, assistant superintendent; P.L. Colson, secretary.

The present officers of the church are David Ryther, P.L. Colson, L.H. Frasure, trustees; William H. Marcellus, P.L. Colson, stewards; Isaac N. Scott, clerk.

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VIII. - BURIAL PLACES.

There is a burying-ground in the southeast part of the town, near J. Clute's, and also one near the house of worship belonging to the Christian church.

At Day Corners is a burial-place, and there may be other points of private family grounds.

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IX. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

At two or three places in town several specimens of Indian relics have been picked up. Near the mouth of Bell brook, in Conklingville, some years ago, several arrowheads, spear-heads, broken pipes, and stone pots were picked up, and one man is said to have discovered a sort of handle, grasping which he gave the command, "Draw sabre," and gave a pull. It held fast, however, and was dislodged only by violent exertion. When it was drawn from the ground it proved to be an old sword, and is supposed to have been a relic of the French and Indian wars. The river formerly fairly teemed with the finest trout, and the valley was a favorite hunting- and fishing-ground for the dusky aborigines. Near the present residence of Richard Flansburgh a few years ago a part of a large stone kettle was plowed up near an old stump. It was made of a kind of soft sandstone, and evidently had served to cook many an Indian dinner in the far past.

When the first settlers came into this country there was a fine clearing on the flat near the river, east of Heman Colson's house. It was surmised to have been an Indian corn-field, but more probably was the result of the labors of some white settler who had been murdered or driven away from the home he had created in the forest by his relentless foes.

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X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The business of lumbering and peeling bark is largely carried on in this town, and furnishes the means of obtaining a livelihood to many of its inhabitants. The tanneries of Henry Poor & Son use most of the bark. The logs are floated down the river to the mills at Conklingville, Jessup's Landing, and Glen's Falls. The principal dealers in these articles are Enos Murphy, E. & H. Darling, Irving W. Guiles, Leonard Yates, and Lewis E. Wait.

In 1833 a woolen-factory was built on Paul creek, about two miles from its mouth, by John B. Yates. A store and other buildings were soon put up, but after a few years the property was put to other uses, and the factory is now occupied as a dwelling-house. The other buildings have gone to decay, and what it was hoped would become a thriving village has dwindled away until nothing remains.

The principal occupations of the people of Day are lumbering, gathering hemlock-bark for market, stock-raising, and general farming, so far as the soil and capabilities of the town permit.

In 1871, F.G. Macomber and William H. Catline built a factory for the purpose of extracting tannic acid from hemlock-bark, to be used in the manufacture of leather. The buildings and machinery and apparatus represented a first cost of $28,000. In ninety days from the time work was commenced the factory was in running order, and turning out a very superior quality of extract. The weight of the extract was about ten pounds to a gallon, and a cord of bark would make about three hundred and fifty pounds of extract. This product was mostly shipped to Boston. The price of extract under excessive competition rapidly declined, and the business became unprofitable. The factory was run for about two years, and then stopped. The machinery was sold to parties at Wellestown, Hamilton county, who removed it, and the building still stands, near the residence of Heman Colson. Mr. Macomber still resides on a fine farm in the eastern part of Edinburgh, in a very pleasant location.

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XI. - MILITARY.

Of the heroes of the Revolutionary war but three are believed to have settled within the limits of Day. These were David Johnson, who died in Day on Feb. 22, 1839, aged 81 years; Amos Flood, who came to Day about 1832, and died there Aug. 17:1834; and Phineas Austin, who died Nov. 21, 1828, aged 81 years.

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In the War of 1812, Daniel Fraker, Joseph Flansburgh, Thomas Totman (fife-major), Zabin Shippy, Arnold Paul, Wm. Colson, Jr., and Moses Colson took up arms and went forth to defend their country. All of them are now numbered with the dead.

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The number of soldiers who went from this town in the years from 1861 to 1865 is, considering the scant population, quite large, and speaks well for the patriotism of the inhabitants. The following is as perfect a list as we have been able to obtain from the means at our disposal:

Dudley O. Allen, corp., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Erie county.

John Beers. priv., Co. E. 169th N.Y. Inf.; discharged; living in Day.

Elijah Bennett, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; discharged; living near Syracuse.

Richard Bills, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; discharged for disability; living in Edinburgh.

Rufus Black, priv., Co. K, 2d Vet. Cav.; enl. June 27, 1864; discharged; living in Hadley.

Silas C. Blowers, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; discharged; living in Michigan.

Harmon Bovencamp, priv., Co. F, 93d N.Y. Inf.; died in hospital at Buffalo, Dec. 14, 1864.

Henry Bovencamp, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

Aaron Bradt, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died in rebel prison at Richmond, Va.

John Bradt, priv., Co. G. 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment June 16, 1863; died in Edinburgh.

Elnathan Bristol, priv, 93d N.Y. Inf.; disch, with the regiment; living at West Day.

Peter Butler, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1862; killed in action at Olustee, Fla.

Henry Clute, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 14, 1862; was killed by the explosion of the mine at Fort Fisher, N.C., being buried in the ruins.

James Colson, discharged; living in Day.

John H. Colson, discharged; living in Day.

John S. Colson, discharged; living at Batchellerville.

Byron Daniels, priv.; died in the service.

James Daniels, discharged; living at Luzerne.

Edwin Delong, priv., 2d N.Y. Yet. Cav.; disch. with the regiment; living at Conklingville.

La Fayette Delong, discharged; living in Michigan.

Andrew Doming, 2d H. Art.; disch. with the regiment; living in Wellstown, Hamilton Co.

Edgar L. Deming, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; discharged; living In Wellstown, Hamilton Co.

John Deming, priv., 2d H. Art.; died in the service.

Gordon Dimick, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 14, 1861.

George Dickerson, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861.

Joseph Ellison, priv.; killed at the battle of Cold Harbor.

Elam F. Evans, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; killed at the battle of the Wilderness in 1864.

Gilbert F. Edmond, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861.

Nicholas Flansburgh, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died in hospital.

Julian Graves, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; discharged; living in Greenfield.

Daniel Guiles, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. with the regiment; living in Day.

Irving W. Guiles, corp., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. June 1, 1861; mustered out June 16, 1863; living at Day Centre.

George Guiles, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. June 1, 1861; trans. to 77 N.Y. Inf.; lost trace of.

Rensselaer Havens, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; disch., with the regiment; died in Day, since the war, of disease contracted in the service.

Charles Herrick, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; disch. with the regiment; living in Edinburgh.

Thomas Hopkins, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. June 1, 1861; discharged; living in Glen's Falls.

Wendell B. Howe, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; killed on the vidette line in front of Petersburg, Va.

William C. Howe, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 8, 1861.

William A. Hunt, corp., Co. D, 4th N.Y. H. Art; enl. Dec. l5, 1861.

David Kinney, priv.; living at Ballston.

Jonathan Kinney, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; living in Rensselaer county

Abram R. Lawrence, corp., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.: enl. June 1, 1861; wounded five times; disch. with the regiment; he also served in the Florida war and in the Mexican war, and is now living in Day.

Philo Roswell Lawrence, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 15, 1861; disch. with the regiment; lives in Wellstown, Hamilton Co.

C.F. Marcellus, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 14, 1861.

John H. Macon, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Day.

Edward Mattison, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861.

Zira H. Mattison, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 1561.

John Michaels, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861 lives in Wellstown, N.Y.

Rienzi Michaels, priv.; substitute for Isaac N. Scott; died in the service.

Ambrose Milliman, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; living in Iowa.

Cutler Milliman, priv., 53d N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; lost an arm in the service; received an honorable discharge; lives in Iowa.

William Milliman, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; living in Iowa.

Jehu McGuire, priv,, Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861.

Zabin Mills, priv., Co. E, 169th N.Y. Inf.; died in the service.

Abijah Ovitt, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.: enl. Dec. 25, 1861; died in the service.

Chauncey Palmer, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. June 1, 1861; mustered out with the regiment; lives in Saratoga.

Arunah Perry, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; mustered in June 1, 1861; mustered out June 16, 1863; lives in Hope, Hamilton Co.

George Pixley, priv.; living in Day.

James Pixley, priv.; living in Warrensburg.

William Pixley, priv.; living in Edinburgh.

Edwin Rhodes, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; mustered out with the regiment; living in Day.

John Ross, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; living in Croweville, town of Day, or Edinburgh.

Charles Ryther, priv.; living in Day.

William Scott, priv., 4th H. Art.; mustered out; living in Hadley.

Samuel B. Shepard, priv.. Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct 22, 1861; lives in Day.

Dennis Springer, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; killed on vidette line in front of Petersburg, Va.

John Stead, Jr., priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; missing.

Beecher Truax, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.

Henry Truax, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; living at Glen's Falls.

John W. Van Arnum, priv.. Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 14, 1861.

John Vanderhoof, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. June 1, 1861; mustered out with the regiment; living in Northampton.

Ransom Varney, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. inf.; enl. 1861.

Solomon Wheeler, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; living in Chautauqua county.

Timothy White, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; living at Creek Centre, Warren Co.

Lorin Woodcock, priv., Co. E, 169th N.Y. Inf.; discharged; living in Ballston.

Stephen Woodcock, priv., Co. E, 169th N.Y. Inf.; living in Tioga Co., Pa.

George Woodworth, priv.; died in Day in 1877.

Charles A. Yates, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; mustered out; living in Day.

Edgar F. Yates, priv.; was never mustered into the service on account of sickness; living in Day.

William H. Zenstine, priv.; living in Batchellerville.

The town, in August, 1864, paid a bounty of $300 to volunteers to fill its quota. In September the amount offered was increased to $950.

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In the troublous times of the War of 1812 a report was circulated that the Indians were coming with tomahawk, scalping-knife, and fire-brand, pillaging, murdering, and burning whatever fell into their revengeful hands. Some of the settlers, among them the Flansburghs, Van Vlecks, Van Pattens, Wooleys, and others, abandoned their farms, packed their household effects and removed to Schenectady in search of peace, safety, and civilization. Some returned; others did not. The settlers who stayed through the excitement, refusing to flee, have ever since felt justified in a little jocose bantering of the ones who were frightened into leaving their homes.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

ENOS MURPHY.

 

Portrait of Enos Murphy

 

The subject of this sketch was born in Canada in the year 1835, and came to Saratoga Co., N.Y., about the year 1853. His early life was spent in the routine of farm labor, and at common district schools. His father, James, was a native of Ireland, and belonged to that hardy race of men who have fought for liberty from oppression, built our canals and railroads, and who by economy and industry have secured homes and wealth in a foreign land. Since he came to this county he has engaged largely in the lumber business, and successfully managed his interests in that direction. In the year 1874 he married Mrs. Melvina, widow of the late Silas Paul, and daughter of John G. Demming. They have two children, George D. and Sarah L.

Mr. Murphy is a man of indomitable perseverance, and early in life became inured to the hardships of labor, and continues to follow the business first engaged in upon coming here, his operations causing him to employ at times some fifty men. He is manly, and kind to all whom he comes in contact with or has in his employ. When he first came to Saratoga County he settled in the town of Day, and floated his logs on Mud lake and Livingston lake, and now uses all the available streams for that purpose.

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