HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

MILTON.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

MILTON is one of the central towns of the county, and is a part of the Kayadrossera patent. It is bounded north by Greenfield, east by Saratoga Springs and Malta, south by Ballston and Charlton, west by Galway. It contains 18,192 acres of improved land, 2743 acres of unimproved, and of this last amount, 1500 are woodland. The population in 1875 was 5349.

For convenience of reference we add the legal description of the town and the definition of its boundary lines, from the revised statutes of the State.

"The town of Milton shall contain all that part of said county bounded northerly by Greenfield, easterly by the east line of the fourteenth allotment of the Kayadrossera patent and the same continued to the north line of the sixteenth allotment, southerly by a line beginning in the southeast corner of the fourteenth allotment of the Kayadrossera patent and running thence west along the bounds of the said allotment to the middle of the south bounds of lot number nine in the subdivision of the allotment aforesaid, and westerly by a line running from thence due north to the southwest corner of the town of Greenfield."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

Its surface is moderately hilly in the north and undulating in the south, with a slight inclination towards the Kayadrossera creek. This stream flows southeast through the centre of the town. The stream has a rapid fall and furnishes valuable water-power. Glowegee creek, from the west, is the principal tributary. In the north part of the town are limestone ridges, extensively quarried for building-stone and for lime.

The town is favorably located for manufacturing purposes, and the Kayadrossera, with its tributaries, furnishes the requisite power for a large amount of machinery. In this respect the town is one of the most favored in the county, and flourishing villages have grown up along the valley of the Kayadrossera, the largest of which is Ballston Spa, at the great southern angle of the stream. The resort of visitors to its mineral springs tended to develop growth at this place in early years, but in later times manufacturing operations have been the source of prosperity. Besides the springs at Ballston Spa there are also two sulphur springs east of Milton Centre, in the vicinity of Rowland's mills.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The time of the first settlement, like that of Ballston, with which it was so closely blended, was just before the Revolution and during its progress. It is usually stated in the gazetteers that the first family which settled within the present limits of Milton was that of David Wood. Probably about the same time that Eliphalet Ball came to the town which bears his name, this pioneer family penetrated the wilderness to the north and located at Milton Hill. David Wood had several sons who settled around him, - one (Benjamin) owning the present farm of David Stever, another one the Rogers farm, and another one the present farm of the county-house, - in all, a tract of six hundred acres. This early pioneer family chose one of the finest locations in this section of country, - a place that for a time promised to be a business centre. The Wood family are said to be buried on the gentle northern slope of the "Hill" east of the road, - their graves unmarked by stone or mound, - a smooth field, where the plow and the reaper of modern times find no obstructions, and pause neither for sentiment nor historic recollections.

Justus Jennings was an early settler of Milton. He was born in Connecticut in 1755. In 1776 he enlisted in the Connecticut line of Continental troops. He was in the battles of Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Monmouth, and White Plains. His brother had already come to this county in 1775, and after the war closed Justus followed him and settled a mile north, in the town of Milton, both being at or near what is known as Hop City Corners. There was a large family of children, even said to number up to eighteen. One son now keeps the Milton House, at Ballston Spa, where Joseph Jennings resides.

Another early settler of Milton was Sanborn Ford. He came from Sand Lake just after the war, and settled at Spear's Corners. He had been in the Revolutionary army seven years; was a musician; was first refused admission on account of his small size, but was finally allowed to take the place of a sick brother; served two years in the infantry, and after that in the cavalry. He was at Bunker Hill, and also was at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis under Colonel Sheldon. He kept a public-house for many years at the foot of the hill, near Judge Thompson's. The sons were John S., still living at Ballston Spa, Simeon, William, and Amasa. Daughters were Mrs. Shepherd, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Lewis, and Mrs. McLean. The latter was the mother of John McLean, of the county clerk's office.

Sanborn Ford once captured a "cow-boy," compelling his enemy to put his finger into the barrel of a loaded pistol and follow him into camp. In after-years he delighted to recall the scenes of the Revolution, and was wont on each returning Fourth of July to gather the old soldiers around him to dinner. In his last years he was an active religious worker. He then called the Bible his side-arms, and ear-tied the book in a velvet bag. At his request, there was buried with him the flag, the Bible, and his commission as an officer of the Revolutionary army. His children recollect his saying that when he first came through the woods to Ballston Spa, tracing his way by marked trees from Spier's Corners, there was near the spring a single unoccupied log house. From this it would seem that some one had made a beginning there earlier than Benajah Douglas, in 1792.

John Lee came from Connecticut about 1793, and settled in Milton, near the Grenelle farm, west of Rock City. His children were Joel, Elias, Noah, Abigail, Ruth. The daughters became respectively Mrs. Ressequie and Mrs. Richards; the sons settled in Milton and vicinity. Joel Lee was appointed postmaster of Ballston Spa by Gideon Granger, postmaster-general, and continued to hold the office nearly fifty years. Two of his sons reside in Ballston Spa, - John J. Lee, for nearly forty years an officer of the Ballston Spa Bank, and Elias W. Lee, merchant. The latter relates the incident that he was in the old cotton-factory, looking at the movement of the grand walking-beam, not more than five minutes before the crash came which destroyed the machinery and the enterprise at the same time.

Abel Whalen came from Sand Lake about the close of the war, and settled at Spier's Corners, a place in very early times known as Whalen's Corners. He had two sons, Abel and Ezekiel. The latter was the well-known merchant for many years at Clute's Corners, one division of the present village of West Milton. Among the very early settlers of the town was Joseph Shearer, whose pioneer homestead near West Milton is still in the hands of his descendants. He came from Scotland before the Revolutionary war. During that fearful period his wife used to walk to Schenectady and bring corn on her back over the Indian trails, have it ground at the old Gordon mill, and thus supply the household. Into this pioneer home came all the hardships of a new country, with sickness and death. A broad stone in the family burial-place tells its own sad story: "Underneath this tablet lie the remains of four children, one a tender infant, nameless here on earth, the other three Joseph, 1777, aged four, James, 1787, aged four, Genet, 1796, aged four." Two sons grew to manhood, - George, who settled on the old place where his son Charles W. now resides, and Joseph, who also settled in Milton.

Joel Mann, from Hebron, Conn., came to Milton in 1793 or '94, and settled on the place which is now the residence of his grandson, Nathaniel Mann. Of his sons, Rodolphus settled in Ballston; Jeremiah, father of Nathaniel, on the old homestead; Joel in Galway; and Hiram in Lyons. The last named became sheriff of Wayne county, and resided a part of the time in Sodus.

One daughter, Mrs. Hanchett, settled in Troy. The present genial proprietor of the old homestead, while claiming no large collection of antiquities, yet believes he has the most famous pork-barrel in the county. It was brought from Hebron in 1794, full of pork. It descended to Jeremiah, full of pork. In strict accordance with the laws of inheritance and the fitness of things, it came to Nathaniel, full of pork, He hopes to keep sacred the ancient family custom, and transmit the venerable barrel to the next generation, full of pork.

To this account of Joel Mann we add the early settlement of his brother, though perhaps it should be included in the history of Ballston. James Mann came from Hebron, Conn., to Ballston, in 1790, and bought one hundred acres one mile west of the springs. Returning to Hebron, he married Miss Tryphena Tarbox, and the winter following they made their bridal-trip to the pine-forests of Ballston. Miss Electa Mann, a daughter, now living upon the old homestead, writes of them as follows:

"They made their journey in a large sleigh, covered with domestic linen. The conveyance was heavily laden with household furniture, and was drawn by au old-fashioned Yankee team, - a yoke of oxen, with a horse ahead. They were several days on the road, but the trip was not entirely lonely. One evening, meeting with a party of fellow-travelers, their resources were thrown together for enjoyment. A union supper and a dance followed, - not keeping as late hours, however, as parties of late times.

"They came over the Middle Line road, leaving it about a mile from their new home. The pine-woods were soon reached, through which the road wound, leading down the hill, over a log causeway, and to a rise of ground where the log house stood. That evening they took supper with the Knapp family, - of whom they purchased the place, - delicious corn-cake, fried pork, and tea. The snow was two feet on the ground, and the March winds made wild music among the thick branches of the forest."

Miss Mann has a picture of the log buildings of the pioneer home, executed partly from her own memory and from her father's description, to which she has added the following lines:

 

"Near an hundred years ago,

The lofty pines stood thickly round:

A settler came, the woodland cleared,

And built his villa on the ground.

Logs within and logs without,

Brave hearts would not repine,

For moral worth and calm content

Brighter than diamonds shine.

Oh then it was a happy day,

Birds sang a sweeter note,

When yea was yea and nay was nay,

Nor bribes secured a vote."

 

A pear-tree near the door, seventy years old, is still bearing.

James Mann's children were Electa, James, who settled on the old homestead, and Joseph, who removed to Kendall, Orleans county.

Simon P. Vedder came from Schenectady county in 1808, and settled where the present parsonage is, at West Milton. He afterwards moved away the building of wood standing there, and it became the first tavern at Spier's Corners, and is the one still kept there. Mr. Vedder rebuilt of brick the present house now owned by the Presbyterian church. The location is a fine one, and commands an extensive and pleasant view.

Mr. Vedder's sons were Abram, who removed to Wisconsin; Daniel C., also to Wisconsin. Daughters, Mrs. William J. Angle, of West Milton; Mrs. Switz, of Schenectady; Mrs. Dr. Walls, of West Milton; Mrs. Chauncey Vibbard, Mrs. Robert Spier, Mrs. A. G. Wylie, her husband, a minister of the Reformed church; and Mrs. Stevens, of Schenectady.

James Hayes, of West Milton, states that there was a "log meeting-house," Presbyterian or Congregational, just within the limits of Galway, and near the first old Covenanter church. It was built probably in the time of the Revolution, and must have been the earliest place of worship in all this part of the county.

The following items are from the recollections of Otis Bentley, - living near the stone church, - a man of eighty-four years, with the vigor, clearness of statement, and accuracy of memory that would indicate not more than sixty-five.

His father, John Bentley, came to this place in 1778 or '79, and settled on the present family homestead. At that time there was only one house at Saratoga Springs. He took up one hundred and fifty acres lease lands. John Cole was then living on the present place of John Dee. Henry Cole was also located northeast from the church. There was no house at the present village of Ballston Spa, but the springs were known and visited to some extent. The only accommodation for the public was a gourd dipper hanging upon a tree near. Who furnished that is not stated.

John Bentley set out an orchard on his first arrival, one hundred years ago. They were just beginning to bear at the earliest recollection of the son. One tree is still left, and bearing.

There were saw- and grist-mills near the present paper-mill in the upper part of Rock City before 1800, usually known then as the Hatch mills, though owned by Swan. This was the first use of the splendid water-power at that point. Not much later than that, however, another one was erected by Rathbone, the first settler at the village of Rock City. There were two brothers Rathbone, one the pioneer merchant and landlord, the other the mill-owner. One of them afterwards removed to Greenfield.

The children of John Bentley by his first wife were Sarah, who became Mrs. Snyder, of Milton; Catharine, Mrs. Green, of Clifton Park; Elizabeth, Mrs. Tillinghast Bentley, of Milton; Charity, Mrs. Southwick, of Greenfield; Patience, Mrs. John P. Bentley, of Troy. John settled in Greenfield, and Abel in Oswego county. By his second wife the children were Otis, who furnishes these items, and seven other sons, all of whom removed to Oswego county, David, Pardon, Stephen, Adam, Elias, Gregory, and Reuben.

The Westcott family came very early, and settled on the present Westcott place.

Jonathan Morey as early as 1780, and located on the present Morey farm.

Benjamin Peck in 1780, on the present Post place. Samuel Reed, in 1800, on the present Stewart place. Silas Adams - long time a deacon in the Baptist church - came about the same time as Mr. Bentley, 1778, and settled where his grandson, Herman Thomas, now resides.

Reuben Weed was an early settler on the Middle Line road.

Uriah Benedict, Isaac Webb, and Jacob Ambler kept store at Howard's Corners, half a mile west of the church, as early as 1800.

Howard was an early settler, and the pioneer of the tanning business in town.

The Scofields lived just over the line in Greenfield. The cemetery northeast of the church, on the Daniel Burgess farm, is nearly or quite one hundred years old. It has been enlarged and is still in use.

There was another burial-place near Page's Corners. A tavern was kept there too in very early times by Baker.

There was a saw-mill before 1800 at Craneville, at the upper end of the present pond, built or run by John Whitehead; there were also a saw-mill and an iron-forge at Factory village.

The sulphur spring near the east line of the town is on the Wing farm. It is of little importance.

Of Mrs. Alvah D. Grenelle the following items have been obtained:

The first Methodist meetings in the northwest portion of the town were held in the barn of Mr. Blinn, on the present John Tubbs' place, the barn still standing. This was about the year 1810.

A camp-meeting was held about the same date, on the farm of Jabez Northrop, now the farm of Wm. Arnold. Joel Keeler, father of Mrs. Grenelle, was requested to attend at the camp-ground to enforce order.

An early minister was Samuel Howe.

Datus Ensign, well known in the annals of early Methodism in this county, also preached in the old barn. He once predicted a great revival for this section of country, relating a dream in which he seemed to see a spring bursting out from the foundations of the barn, and watering with its abundant flow all the surrounding fields.

Preaching was next held at Mr. Keeler's, and not long after the meeting-house was built at Swan's Corners.

Samuel Luckey, afterwards doctor of divinity and regent of the University, was an early itinerant minister on this circuit.

The meeting-house was thirty by forty feet, built largely by contributions of labor and materials; probably not more than $250 cash expended upon it.

Joel Keeler came from Westchester county. He first removed to Auburn, and there built the first frame building, for Colonel Hardenburgh, from whom the place was called Hardenburgh's Corners. In 1797 he came to Milton, and settled on the present Alvah D. Grenelle farm. The old pioneer log house stood east of the orchard, down the hill. The place was bought of Joshua Jones, who must have been a still earlier pioneer. Of Mr. Keeler's children, Jane became Mrs. Hawkins, and settled in Milton; Ann, Mrs. Miller, her husband being a Methodist minister; Eliza, Mrs. Grenelle; and Mary, Mrs. Joshua Swan.

Benjamin Grenelle was an early settler, removing from Salisbury, Conn., to Greenfield, in 1787. He had three sons, Benjamin C., of Brockport; Alvah D., of Milton; and John S., of Troy. Among early neighbors was Henry Fillmore, settled in 1787, where John Emigh now resides, and Newcomb Hewitt not long after. Joel Keeler was the first postmaster in this section, and Mr. Scribner, of Ballston, was the mail-carrier, and the curious two-wheeled conveyance in which he used to appear every Friday is well remembered by the older people.

Mrs. Grenelle mentions among the early teachers Mr. English and Ebenezer Luther. Somewhat later, Mr. Gardner and Eunice Manning. Among early physicians, Dr. Wood, Dr. Henderson, Dr. Gregory. Abel Whitlock was an early blacksmith in this neighborhood, settled near the old church at Swan's Corners, and opened a tavern in 1808, or about that time.

The father of Joel Keeler was Captain Isaac Keeler, an officer in the Revolutionary army. He was a prisoner for several months at New York. When captured he received a sword-cut, and his life was saved by a buckle in the strap over his shoulder. The strap with the buckle, parted by the blow of the sword, is now in the possession of Isaac Keeler Grenelle, who also has the sword of his great-grandfather, with the inheritance of his name. He has also a curious watch, the property of his grandfather, Joel Keeler, and several other relics of olden times. Mrs. Grenelle, last year, at the Centennial, had the pleasure of seeing an old chair bearing the name of Isaac Keeler.

Wm. Johnson was an early pioneer, an Englishman, locating northwest of Clute's Corners.

David Roberts settled near Rowland's Mills. A son, Phineas, used to play on the bass viol in the old church at Milton Hill.

Walter Patchin lived on the Middle Line road. The farm is still in the hands of his descendants.

Further items of early settlement and the names of settlers appear in the church and village sketches, as well as in the records of organization and the lists of town officers.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

It might be supposed that this town had received its name from some enthusiastic admirer of "Paradise Lost," and that if no other name in the county had a cultured literary origin this at least had. It is the "mission of the historian" to dispel all such fancies, and recite only veritable facts. This name, like Upton, Ballston, and other words of like termination, is no doubt a specimen of growth, not classical taste. The winding Kayadrossera, drawing an irregular diagonal through the town and furnishing abundant water-power, afforded ample opportunity for mills, that grand necessity of a new country. The upper part of old Ballston quite early became noted in this respect, and was generally known as Mill-town. This soon developed, or rather consolidated, into Milton.

The records of seven years, from 1792 to 1798, are lost from the clerk's office of the town, and the account of the first town-meeting must therefore be omitted, and such items as may usually be taken for the purposes of history from the early years of the town organization. As at first constituted in 1792, the town included that portion of Greenfield which was a part of the old district of Ballston. Greenfield was, however, set off in 1793, so that Milton was reduced to its present size at that early date. For trade and business the people of the northern portion of Milton conveniently drive to Saratoga Springs; the southern portion, to Ballston Spa. Some of the smaller villages are places of considerable business activity and some trade, as shown in another place.

We add the supervisors, clerks, and collectors as far as they can be obtained from the office.

 

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TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.

 

 

Supervisors.

Town Clerks.

Collectors.

1792.

John Ball.

Record Lost.

Record Lost.

1793.

Abel Whalen.

"

"

1794.

"

"

"

1795.

Elisha Powell.

"

"

1796.

"

"

"

1797.

Walter Patchin.

"

"

1798.

"

"

"

1799.

"

Ezekiel Whalen.

Benjamin Gregory.

1800.

Henry Frink.

"

"

1801.

"

"

"

1802.

Jeremy Rockwell.

"

"

1803.

"

"

"

1804.

Silas Adams.

"

"

1805.

Elisha Powell

"

"

1806.

"

"

"

1807.

"

"

Eli Beardslee.

1808.

"

"

William Clark.

1809.

Joel Keeler.

Silas Wood.

Eli Beardslee.

1810.

"

"

William G. Boss.

1811.

"

"

"

1812.

"

"

Reuben Wood.

1813.

Daniel Couch, Jr.

Alpheus Goodrich.

Nathaniel Stewart.

1814.

"

"

"

1815.

"

"

"

1816.

Joel Keeler.

"

Daniel Couch, Jr.

1817.

"

"

Joseph Jennings.

1818.

"

"

"

1819.

Thomas Dibble.

"

Nathaniel Stewart.

1820.

"

"

Philip H. McOmber.

1821.

"

"

Benham Smith.

1822.

Thomas Palmer.

"

Hezekiah R. Hoyt.

1823.

"

"

Joseph Jennings.

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

"

"

"

1826.

"

"

Hiram Boss.

1827.

"

"

Joseph Jennings.

1828.

"

"

Thomas D. Prior.

1829.

"

"

Alonzo Fuller.

1830.

"

"

Thomas D. Prior.

1831.

"

"

Rowland A. Wright.

1832.

"

"

Thomas D. Prior.

1833.

Isaac Frink.

"

William W. Arnold.

1834.

"

"

"

1835.

"

"

"

1836.

"

"

"

1837.

"

"

"

1838.

James M. Cook.

"

"

1839.

Abr'm Middlebrook.

"

Barnabas M. Corey.

1840.

Sylvester Blood.

"

"

1841.

"

"

Legrand Johnson.

1842.

Hiram Rowland.

Horace Goodrich.

Harvey N. Hill.

1843.

"

Wm. T. Odell.

Erastus Morehouse.

1844.

James M. Cook.

"

Wm. W. Arnold.

1845.

"

Wheeler K. Booth.

Daniel Bronson.

1846.

Hiram Wood.

"

David Derrick.

1847.

Isaiah Blood.

David Maxwell.

Harvey Kilmer.

1848.

Daniel W. Culver.

Samuel De Forest.

Abram Wood.

1849.

John Talmadge.

John H. Westcott.

John J.G. Fort.

1850.

James Ashman.

"

Stephen McIntosh.

1851.

"

"

Solomon Bearup.

1852.

Daniel W. Culver.

"

"

1853.

George W. Ingalls.

Seymour Chase.

Harvey Kilmer.

1854.

Wm. T. Odell.

Laurence W. Bristol.

Edwin Hall.

1855.

Isaiah Blood.

Peter C. Gordon.

"

1856.

Daniel W. Culver.

Charles E. Jones.

Isaac K. Grinell.

1857.

George W. Ingalls.

"

Lorenzo D. Haight.

1858.

Wm. T. Odell.

"

Andrew Taylor.

1859.

Isaiah Blood.

"

"

1860.

Wm. T. Odell.

"

Henry S. Swan.

1861.

George W. Ingalls.

"

Andrew Taylor.

1862.

Geo. W. Chapman.

"

Hugh Whalen.

1863.

Cornwell M. Noxon.

"

"

1864.

Edw. H. Chapman.

"

"

1865.

"

Chas. E. Jones.

Robert J. Allison.

1866.

Hiro Jones.

Jonathan S. Smith.

"

1867.

"

"

Clarence B. Kilmer.

1868.

"

Joseph H. Thomas,

elected president.

Seth Whalen, app.

"

1869.

Isaiah Blood.

Wm. G. Ball.

Charles J. Newton.

1870.

"

"

"

1871.

Hiro Jones.

John V.N. Barrett.

Steph'n C. Medberry.

1872.

Clarence B. Kilmer.

Wm. G. Ball.

"

1873.

John McLean.

George W. Oakley.

"

1874.

George West, Jr.

W.B.H. Outt.

James Clute.

1875.

"

Leverett J. Seeley.

Chas. J. Newton.

1876.

Geo. L. Thompson.

"

"

1877.

"

W.H. Chapman, res.

Jas. W. Morris, app.

"

1878.

"

John M. Carlin.

"

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1830.

Alpheus Goodrich.

1855.

James Ladow.

Abraham Middlebrook.

1831.

William J. Angle.

1856.

David Maxwell.

1832.

Thomas Palmer.

1857.

Henry Crippen.

1833.

Oran G. Otis.

Daniel Couch.

1858.

Seymour Chase.

1834.

Alpheus Goodrich.

1859.

James Ladow.

1835.

William J. Angle.

1860.

David Maxwell.

1836.

George G. Scott.

1861.

Seth Whalen.

1837.

James Ladow.

1862.

David Morris.

1838.

Eliphalet St. John.

1863.

James Ladow.

1839.

William J. Angle.

1864.

David Maxwell.

Solomon A. Parks.

1840.

George G. Scott.

1865.

Cornwell M. Noxon.

1841.

James Ladow.

1866.

Aaron G. Waring.

1842.

Abram T. Davis.

1867.

James Leggett.

Charles H. Wickham.

1843.

William J. Angle.

1868.

David Maxwell.

1844.

George G. Scott.

1869.

Seth Whalen.

1845.

Ezra Westcott.

1870.

Samuel D. Sherwood.

1846.

David Maxwell.

1871.

James Leggett.

1847.

Henry Crippen.

1872.

David Maxwell.

1848.

Callender Beecher.

1873.

Stephen B. Jackson.

Jacob S. Settle.

1849.

Le Grand Johnson.

1874.

Daniel Boyce.

1850.

David Maxwell.

Ezra Westcott.

Samuel De Forest.

1875.

David Morris.

1851.

Daniel Bronson.

1876.

Theodore F. Hamilton.

1852.

Charles D. Allen.

M. Lemet Williams.

William Wilson.

1877.

John H. Smith.

Palmer S. Kilmer.

1853.

Ezra Westcott.

1878.

James Miller

1854.

Augustus E. Brown.

 

 

 

Under a special statute the town was authorised to elect a police justice once in two years.

 

1863-65.

David Maxwell.

1875.

G.W. Hall (resigned).

1867-73.

John B. McLean.

1876-77.

Alvah C. Dake.

 

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V. - VILLAGES.

BALLSTON SPA.

A separate chapter is devoted to the history of this village, following that of the town of Ballston, and considerable material belonging to the history of Milton is included in that chapter, particularly the extensive operations of George West, in the Kayadrossera valley.

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BLOODVILLE.

This little hamlet, just beyond the limits of the corporation of Ballston, has grown up principally around the scythe and axe manufactory, established in 1824, by Isaiah Blood, and derives from him its name. This tool establishment has a national reputation, the name of "I. Blood" stamped upon scythes, axes, and other edge-tools, having gone into every part of the country. The lower mill, for the manufacture of axes, is upon the site of an old pioneer saw-mill. The site of the upper mill was not occupied by machinery until employed by Mr. Blood: The property remained in the hands of its founders until his death, in November, 1870; it then passed into the hands of his son-in-law, Henry Knickerbocker, a banker and broker in New York. The last checks signed by Mr. Blood, Oct. 10, 1870, are framed and preserved in the office. The business requires from two hundred to two hundred and fifty hands. The quantity of goods sold yearly is simply immense, - twelve thousand dozen of scythes, eight thousand dozen of axes, and ten thousand dozen of other tools. The enterprise has been steadily continued through all these years.

Isaiah Blood was the son of Sylvester Blood, an early pioneer, and inherited the business from him. In an old invoice or census-roll, by United States Marshal Wilkins, lacking any date, however, but preserved in the office of the county clerk, the name of Sylvester Blood appears, and his business estimated at one hundred axes. This is the enterprise which, descending in the family, has developed to the thousands of dozens already stated.

At Bloodville may also be mentioned the establishment of Benjamin Barber, comprising lumber-yard, planing-mill, sash and blind factory. This was started in 1857; employs eight or ten hands.

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FACTORY VILLAGE.

This place is next above Bloodville, and has grown up around the two paper-mills located upon the Kayadrossera. One of these is the property of the Cook estate. It is run by the firm of Jones & Settle, employs about twenty-five hands, manufactures collar paper, three hundred and twenty-five to three hundred and fifty tons a year. The lower mill is owned by John McLain, and turns out daily about four thousand five hundred pounds of straw-print. At this village there was erected a neat union chapel in 1872, where a Sunday-school is maintained, and occasional preaching by the pastor of Ballston Spa.

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CRANEVILLE.

is another hamlet still farther up the stream, taking its name from Murray Crane, who lived there for many years, but is now a resident of Ballston Spa. The paper-mill at this point is mentioned in the account of George West's operations, in the Ballston Spa history.

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MILTON CENTRE.

This village is at the point where the Middle Line road crosses the Kayadrossera. The grist-mill at this point was established by General Gordon just after the war. It is said that his materials for building were gathered before the war broke out, that the millstones were left leaning against trees during the troublous period, and that they had sunk by their weight half-way into the ground before peace enabled the general to complete his plans. The present building is in part the one erected then. At this place is a large tannery now owned by Samuel Haight. About one hundred hands are employed; the line of business combines both tanning and currying. Imitation goat and kid are manufactured. The finished work is sent mostly to New York, and more than half of it is exported to Europe. They place in the vat an average daily amount of two hundred and thirty sides. This tannery was built by Seth Rugg, about the year 1830. It was sold by the Ruggs to Mr. Morey, by him to Jacob Adams, and the latter sold it to the present proprietor about eight years since.

The Rugg family came in just after the Revolutionary war, and settled opposite the present tannery. Sylvanus Rugg the pioneer was a wheelwright, and made all the spinning-wheels used in this section of country for many years. David Stever, a nephew of Seth Rugg, the founder of the tannery, lives south of the centre, near Milton Hill.

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WEST MILTON.

This village consists of two separate divisions, Speir's Corners and Clute's Corners. The post-office known as West Milton has sometimes been at one place and sometimes at the other. Like the other villages of the town, water-power has had considerable share in its prosperity. The original grist-mill was built before 1800 by Daniel Campbell, of Schenectady. Simon P. Vedder was his agent in charge of the business; Jacobus Barhydt was the carpenter who executed the work, and afterwards became the miller. Ezekiel Whalen also built a mill near the present paper-mill of George West. Abram Vedder kept the first store at Speir's Corners. He was succeeded by Robert Spier.

Ezekiel Whalen opened the first store at Clute's Corners, in the large building now standing at the intersection of the roads. These villages are pleasantly situated in a delightful section of the town. At Speir's Corners is the Presbyterian church, a history of which appears in another place. At Clute's Corners the Wilson chapel and Wilson park are features that indicate, not only the generosity of an individual donor, but the public spirit, culture, and refinement of the community. From their book of records we find that the "Wilson park association of West Milton" had its inception in the summer of 1874, when one of the persons subsequently named among its corporators suggested to the then owner of the premises, William Wilson, that he allow the young men of the place to "remove the fence in front of the grove, cut out the underbrush, and make it accessible as a place of recreation for the school-children, provide the same with seats where those passing by might rest, and erect suitable accommodations for picnics and other open-air gatherings; in short, to convert the premises into a public park." Permission being given, the first work in the removing of fences was done by public-spirited young men, Sept. 5, 1874. Not long after, William Wilson, who had been a resident of the place for sixty years, donated to an incorporated society the ground he had permitted them to improve, and also built and presented to the community a neat and convenient chapel now standing upon the premises. The grounds of the public school also being thrown open, in connection with the grounds, make an entire park of more than three acres. The chapel cost about $900.

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ROCK CITY AND ROCK CITY FALLS.

These are parts of one village that has grown up still farther up the valley around the mills that have been established there from time to time. The upper portion seems to be considered "Rock City," the lower, "Rock City Falls." The first paper-mill was one now owned by George West. It was built in 1840, by Rowland & Kilmer, - burned a few years later, and rebuilt by Kilmer & Ashmun, in 1845. The firm then became Buchanan & Kilmer, and still later was changed to Harlow, Kilmer & Co. At the death of Mr. Kilmer it was sold to Mr. West. The other paper-mill, now owned by C. Kilmer & Son, was remodeled from an early grist-mill, about 1846 or 1847, by Isaac Rowland, Jr. Not succeeding in the enterprise, the property was sold to Buchanan & Kilmer. This was the second mill in the United States that entered upon the manufacture of straw print, and it has continued it successfully to the present time, making now three and a half tons a day, or $125,000 worth per year. The number of hands employed is thirty-three. The paper made is all sold to the New York Sun.

The following general notes are kindly furnished by Harlow Van Ostrand, who is now, and has been for many years, intimately connected with Rock City and its business enterprises:

"There is a legend that, before the Kayadrossera was obstructed by dams, shad and herring reached Rock City Falls, which the old inhabitants remember as a fact, - and the Indians resorted here, caught and dried them on the high banks. Valentine Rathbone, a long-time resident, was one of the early settlers. He built a hotel and store. The latter was burned in 1846, the former stood down through the years until it was torn down in 1877. It had been used as a dwelling-house from 1820, and for many years there was no hotel or store. The store now standing was built in 1849, by Harlow Van Ostrand, and the present hotel by John and Andrew Taylor. Peter H. Kilmer and Isaac Van Ostrand were early residents, and, as carpenters, left their mark on buildings considered in those days especially fine. They helped build the old Ballston Centre church in connection with "Uncle" Aaron Van Ostrand, as he was known in early times. A former apprentice, Mr. Manning, having taken the job, employed "Uncle Aaron" to superintend the laying out of the frame, which was of heavy timber. At the time of the Adventist excitement, in 1843, at an evening lecture by Mr. Miller, the old church was densely crowded above and below, and some began to be fearful of a crush under the weight. The commotion was assuming 'panic' proportions, when Uncle Aaron, who was present, rose and said to the excited throng, 'You can't break it down, I know, for I helped build it.' "

Aaron Van Ostrand removed with his family from Connecticut, soon after the war, into the town of Milton. Early neighbors were Alpheus Moore and his sons David and Moses, Mr. Millard, Joel Keeler, Nathan Frink, Mr. Taylor and his son John, and Joel Lee, afterwards so many years postmaster at Ballston Spa.

Aaron Van Ostrand did a part of the carpenter work on the Episcopal church at Milton Hill. This was built on a square supposed to be the centre of the town, and in early days town-meetings were held there. On the square was a school-house and a Presbyterian church. There was a tablet, said to have been painted by Benedict Clark, placed on the wall at the side of the high pulpit in that old Episcopal church, that the then youthful eyes of the writer greatly admired. The inscription was in a half-circle, "How amiable are thy tabernacles, O Lord of Hosts."

The first post-office at Rock City was established in 1849. Harlow Van Ostrand was appointed postmaster, and has retained the office ever since. Oscar Granger was the contractor for carrying the mail.

The first post-office in the town of Milton was established at the residence of Joel Keeler, the present place of Alvah D. Grenelle.

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MILTON HILL.

This cannot now claim to be a village, but it had very hopeful prospects for twenty or thirty years succeeding the Revolution. There was Powell's store, at one time selling more goods than any other country store in the county. Two churches were erected there. It was on the Middle Line read, the centre of the town, and in itself a beautiful hill; but in after-years stores, churches, and business enterprises were attracted to Ballston Spa and the villages above. The store was closed, the churches dissolved, their houses of worship removed. Speculation in corner-lots and the opening of broad avenues ceased to excite the citizens of the "Hill."

Mr. Powell's store was on the corner of the road leading to West Milton from the "Hill." His dwelling-house is still standing near. Mr. Powell came about 1800. Of his sons, Elisha is now living in New York, Westill W. in Tennessee, George B. a lumber merchant of Oswego. A daughter, Elizabeth, now Mrs. Dr. Wright, resides at Newtown, Long Island.

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ROWLAND'S MILLS.

This hamlet is on the eastern line of Milton, and not far from the village of Saratoga Springs. The place is named from H.R. Rowland, the proprietor of the saw-and grist-mills that are situated upon one of the branches of the Kayadrossera. Southeast of the mills there are also stone-works. Prince Wing resides at Rowland's Mills, and is very extensively engaged in milling, burning lime, and farming. In these occupations he employs a large number of persons. Prince Wing is a native of the town of Greenfield, his father having settled there at an early date.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

The town organized its school districts in pursuance of the law of 1812.

The school at Ballston Spa is the largest and most important in the town. Other schools of considerable numbers and sustained with a commendable public spirit are at West Milton, Rock City, Milton Centre, and Bloodville.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT, MARCH 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

931

$417.12

$640.32

$541.79

$31.06

$1630.29

" 2

64

52.14

44.02

27.13

2.14

125.43

" 3

66

52.14

45.39

37.61

2.20

137.34

" 4

39

52.14

26.82

21.33

1.30

101.59

" 5

55

52.14

37.83

30.03

1.83

121.83

" 6

45

52.14

30.95

22.32

1.50

106.91

" 7

99

52.14

68.09

79.11

3.30

254.78

" 8

45

52.14

30.95

23.55

1.50

108.14

" 9

55

52.14

37.83

45.61

1.84

137.42

" 10

113

52.14

77.72

63.28

3.77

249.05

" 11

120

52.14

82.53

97.41

4.00

288.22

" 12

92

52.14

63.28

73.16

3.07

191.65

" 13

38

52.14

26.14

22.31

1.27

101.86

 

1762

$1042.80

$1211.87

$1084.64

$58.78

$3554.51

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

ST. JAMES' CHURCH (EPISCOPAL).

In the year 1796 a parish styled St. James' church, Milton, was organized under the auspices of Rev. Ammi Rogers, who seems to have gone everywhere doing good. The first vestry of the parish was James Henderson and David Roberts, wardens; Abel Whalen, William Bolt, Joel Mann, Hugh McGinness, William Johnson, Henry Whitlock, John Ashton, Thomas Shepherd, vestrymen. The church stood on Milton Hill, near the present schoolhouse. Rev. Charles McCabe, pastor of the Presbyterian church in Milton, entered the Episcopal ministry and was for some years the rector of St. James'. About the year 1845 the services of the parish were discontinued and the members united with that of Christ church, Ballston Spa. The property was bought by Nathaniel Mann in 1849. Among the pastors are mentioned Rev. J. Perry, 1810; Rev. Mr. Adams, in 1809. Contributors to sustain the church were Everts, Alles, Barkers, Daniel Crawford, who lived south of Saratoga Springs; Anthony Creal, Phineas Roberts, Benjamin Crawford, Eli Beardsley, Martha Fullerton, Abner Hoyt, Hezekiah R. Hoyt, Noah Pullen, who lived in Galway; John Bennett, Philip J. Kellogg, Benjamin Bennett, Abner Wilson, Jared Tallmage, Isaac Tallmage, Thomas B. Safford, Sarah Booth, Seth Tallmage, William Bolt, Levi Gregory, Ziba Taylor. These were all, no doubt, contributors as early as 1800, or soon after.

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PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF MILTON.

It appears from the records in the office of the county clerk that this society was incorporated June 2, 1791. It may have been organized earlier than that, but then for the first time filed its certificate in accordance with law. The full name was "The Presbyterian Society of Milton, in the town of Ballston."

The trustees named in the certificate are William Williamson, Ebenezer Couch, Benajah Smith, Silas Adams, Stephen Wood, Esquire Patchin. The signatures were witnessed by Cornelius Vandenburgh and G.N. Schoonhoven, and the return is signed by John Ball and Hezekiah Middlebrook, officers of the meeting. The meeting-house was at Milton Hill, and stood northeast from the present school-house, on the line of the highway.

Mr. Hovey was an early minister here, and in later years the names of Wright and Hermance are mentioned. The society was dissolved about the year 1840-41, some of the members uniting with the church at West Milton, and others at Ballston Spa.

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BAPTIST SOCIETY KNOWN AS THE "STONE CHURCH."

This is in the Bentley neighborhood, east of Rock City. The society was organized before 1800. The first meetings were held in private houses and in barns. The first meeting-house was built of wood, on the site of the present one, in 1801. The work was done by Elder Lewis, who also built the old farm-house of the Bentleys. It stood till 1826, when the present substantial stone building was erected. This Baptist church was one of the pioneer societies of the town. Services have generally been maintained from the first settlement to the present time, The lot for the church site was bought in 1801, and deeded to John Bentley, Silas Adams, Daniel Green, Salmon Child, and Reuben Weed. The parsonage lot was bought Feb. 19, 1828.

A number of individuals from Stephentown, Rensselaer Co., from White Creek, Washington Co., and from Stillwater moved into this part of Milton about 1785, and were soon after formed into a branch of the Stillwater Baptist church, receiving and dismissing members and managing their own affairs.

At a council June 22, 1793, the church was constituted an independent body, with forty-eight members. The earlier meetings were in barns and in dwelling-houses. The ministers encountered peculiar difficulties in discharging their duties. They had to travel through forests guided only by marked trees or over roads rudely and imperfectly opened. Their temporal wants were supplied by hard labor in secular employments, and their services on the Sabbath were but sparingly rewarded by pecuniary remuneration. This proceeded from inability of brethren in a new country rather than from any want of disposition to help their ministers. Some of the ministers were here but a short time, and no date is given. Smith, Covil, Finch, Lee, McClure, Rogers, Irish, and Peck were here when meetings were held in barns and dwellings.

The following is a list of the ministers, with the dates of their pastorates: Jonathan Nicols, 1803-7; Samuel Plum, 1814-22; Clay, 1822-24; E. Tucker, 1825-26; T. Powel, 1828-36; A. Seamans, 1836-37; J.B. Wilkins, 1838-39; J. Goadby, 1840-41; W.B. Curtis, 1842-48; Caleb Gurr, 1849-52; E.B. Crandell, 1852-54; Lewis Sellick, 1856-57; F.N. Barlow, 1857-60.

A. G. Waring is the superintendent of the Sunday-school, which numbers seventy members.

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PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF WEST MILTON.

This church was organized as the Covenanters or Reformed Presbyterians. It was the religious society of the solid Scotch emigrants who came to Milton and Ballston during or soon after the Revolution, and settled what was known as Paisley Street. Their sturdy Christian faith is still reflected in their children's children. The marble over their graves may crumble, their old homesteads may disappear, but their faith lives and flourishes. The first house of worship was erected on the present farm of John T. Conde, a mile and a half west of Spier's Corners. It was about forty feet square, two stories, with a spacious, old-fashioned gallery. It was abandoned in 1840, the old building sold to James Hayes, who moved it to his place in Galway and made a carriage-house of it. The new edifice was erected at Spier's Corners, on a beautiful elevation, soon after the sale of the old one, 1840 or '41.

The successive ministers of this church were of much character and ability, eight out of the twelve having received the degree of doctor of divinity. The first pastor was James McKinney, who came from Ireland just after the United Irish rebellion, 1798. He was a large and powerful man both of body and mind. He was followed by the Rev. Gilbert McMaster, a name that afterwards become noted in the annals of American Presbyterianism. The remaining ministers have been Samuel Wilson, John N. McLeod, Rev. A. S. McMaster, son of the second pastor, Rev. Samuel Stevenson, Rev. R.H. Beattie, Rev. M. McAleese, Rev. David G. Bullions, Rev. Peter Brooks, Rev. Andrew Johnston, and Rev. Wm. Scholl.

The first elders, elected about the year 1800, were John Willson (father of William Willson, the recent donor of the chapel and park), Alexander Glen, John Burns, Joseph Shearer, Alexander Donnon. All of these first elders and several of the later ones belonged to the Paisley Street settlement, and are spoken of by those who remember them as a noble race of strong, brave Christian pioneers. The remaining elders have been Andrew Gardner, James Guthrie, Robert Willson, James Hayes, William Willson, Charles McClew, William Charles, Adam Clute, Matthew Sherwood, John Parent, James Allison, John A. Clute, Noah S. Young, Frederick Streever, John T. Conde.

James Hayes, from whom these and many other items have been obtained, is still living, a ruling elder sixty years, a fair specimen of the solid men of old, who laid the foundation of our civil and religious institutions. With intense love for the faith of his fathers and the faith of his children, he is passing a serene and quiet old age, approaching with unfaltering trust the end of a long and useful life.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, ROCK CITY FALLS.

The first meeting for organizing this society was held about the first of March, 1844. Alanson Richards, one of the circuit ministers, presided, and a committee to secure subscriptions was appointed, consisting of Joshua Swan, Gilbert Swan, Charles R. Lewis, Constant Potter, Seth Whalen, Darius J. Hewitt, William C. Kelley, and Asa P. Frink. At the second meeting, March 9, 1844, trustees were chosen as follows: Seth Whalen, Charles R. Lewis, Joshua Swan, James McIntosh, Harlow Kilmer. At a meeting of the trustees, April 22,, Joseph Riggs was chosen clerk of the society, a building committee was named, - Joshua Swan, James McIntosh, Seth Whalen, and Harlow Kilmer. April 27, proposals were invited to build a house of wood fifty-four by thirty-two. May 4, the proposal of Harlow Kilmer to erect the house for $1300 was unanimously accepted. Among the subscribers to the building fund were Joseph Riggs, $100; James McIntosh, Charles R. Lewis, Joshua Swan, Seth Whalen, John Taylor, $50 each; Harlow Kilmer, $30; Constant Potter, Abraham Haynor, Asa P. Frink, Samuel Craig, Gilbert Swan, Darius J. Hewitt, Harlow Kilmer, David Van Ostrand, Roscius R. Kennedy, Isaac Rowland, Jr., Seth Whalen, and Joshua Swan, $25 each; Thomas G. Arnold, $20; Norman Arnold and Nelson Walter, $15 each. These were all the subscriptions that exceeded $10.

March 26, 1855, Harlow Van Ostrand was elected clerk. April 11, 1868, the church basement was permitted to be used for academic purposes.

A ladies' aid society raised in 1863-67 nearly $300 for parsonage matters, and the parsonage, from the record, seems to have been completed by the liberal aid of George West and C. Kilmer.

This Methodist house of worship was the successor of an older one that was built at Swan's Corners in 1811. That house is still standing, devoted to other uses, but with the pulpit and altar still there, and some of the seats, - objects of interest and almost of veneration to some long since removed to other towns, who wander back to the scenes of their childhood, and recall the early services in the old house.

In connection with this church was a Sunday-school in 1825-27. Among the scholars were Zerah Hoyt, now pastor of the Congregational church in Greenfield, Eleanor Tallman, Harlow Van Ostrand, and others now in middle or advanced life. A Bible class was conducted by Rev. Samuel Young, a local preacher.

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CATHOLIC CHURCH, ROCK CITY FALLS.

This place was visited occasionally for many years from Saratoga. Mass on these occasions was said sometimes in the district school-house, but most generally in the dwelling-house of Mrs. Vogel. Mrs. Vogel's may be said to have been the cradle of Catholicity at the "Falls;" there the priest ever received a hearty welcome, and the people accommodation. This lady and her son John were the first and most active in the movement for a church at the "Falls."

Rev. John McMenomy, in the month of October, 1872, after mass in the school-house, organized a meeting at which a subscription for a church was opened. Plans were procured, and a contract made in January following. The church was finished and paid for within the year, with the exception of about $300. Mr. Chauncey Kilmer generously donated a lot one hundred and fifty by two hundred feet; his son Clarence gave $300; Mr. Welsh, $500; and his son $100 towards the erection of the church. The edifice was incorporated in July, 1874. The first incorporators were John J. Conroy, bishop; Rt. Rev. Francis McNerney, acting vicar-general; John McMenomy, pastor; together with John Vogel and John Enright, the two laymen of the congregation. The corporate title of the church is "The Church of St. Paul, of Rock City Falls, N.Y."

The first pastor of the church was Rev. P. Smith, appointed November, 1875. The present pastor, 1878, is Michael Mullany. The church was dedicated in September, 1877, by Bishop McNerney, assisted by Rev. P. Havermaus, of Troy, Rev. J. McMenomy, of Saratoga, and its pastor, Rev. M. Mullany. Father Havermaus preached. The choir of St. Peter's, Saratoga, sang the mass.

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VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

As in the case of other towns, places of burial are numerous. In the northwest is a finely-situated burial-ground, opposite the place of A.D. Grenell. Northwest of Rowland's Mills is another, in which burials occurred at an early date. West of Spier's Corners, near the place of S. Young, is a cemetery of considerable age. Near the Presbyterian church of that place is the large cemetery of modern times. In the vicinity of the smaller villages there are also cemeteries. There is one in the Judge Thompson neighborhood, and some places of private burial already mentioned in another place.

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IX. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

Two or three points of considerable historic interest are spoken of in the chapter upon the town of Ballston, places that were in the part of the town which afterwards became Milton. These will be noticed in the extracts from Judge Scott's address, and under various other heads both in this and other chapters.

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X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The people of the town are very largely engaged in manufacturing enterprises, and these are fully stated in connection with the notices of villages. The agriculture of some portions of the town is, however, of an excellent and superior character. In the western, central, and southern portions there are many fine farms, fertile and productive, giving evidence of the skill, intelligence, and practical thrift of their owners.

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XI. - MILITARY.

In the War of 1812 there went from the town of Milton, according to Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor, the following soldiers: Captain Reuben Westcott, Cornelius Schermerhorn, Freeman Thomas, W.J. Stillwell, Oliver Whitehead, Daniel Beach, John Wheeler, Alva Robertson, Timothy Bailey, and doubtless others.

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The following is the military roll of those who went from this town into the War of 1861-65. The action of the town in the raising of bounties was prompt and patriotic. As in other cases, the list has been advertised and left for correction several weeks at Ballston Spa.

Adna Abbs, Jr., enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; wounded; taken prisoner May 10, 1864; re-transf. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

William Arnold, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; wounded; prisoner May 6, 1864; died.

Charles Andrews, enl. Sept. 16, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; wounded May 18, 1864; transferred.

Alonzo Allen, enl. Aug. 2, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; corp.

Arnold T. Ayres, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D; corp.

Braman Ayres, Jr., enl. Dec. 26, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

William Abbs, enl. Jan. 4, 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

William Campbell, enl. June 22, 1863, 13th Art., Co. I; corp.

Ephraim J. Tripp, enl. Sept. 6, 1862; disch. July 10, 1865; was taken prisoner May 10, and recaptured June 10, 1865.

William Bartel, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

William Bortell, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Thomas C. Black, enl. Nov. 28, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Daniel E. Bortell, enl. Nov. 28, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Marcus Burras, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D; corp.

James Bortell, enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; died of wounds June 16, 1864, at Washington.

William A. Baker, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

William G. Ball, enl. Dec., 1863; capt.; disch. Sept., 1865.

George Bolton, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.; killed at Cold Harbor, June 4, 1864.

Isaac Boise, enl. Sept. 18, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; served through; disch. Dec. 13, 1864.

William H. Boise, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Feb. 20, 1862, at Yorktown.

Nathan Brown, enl. Sept 19, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; served through; disch. Dec. 13, 1864.

Andrew Brower, enl. Sept. 22, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

David Borst, enl. Sept. 28, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; trans. to Bat., Dec. 4, 1863.

James W. Bacon, enl. Oct. 25, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; trans. to U. S. Cav.

Case Ballou, enl. Sept. 25, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; disch. for disability, June 16, 1862.

Edwin Bobenreath, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D.

Alexander J. Beach, enl. Jan. 1, 1864, 13th Art., Co. E; capt.; died of fever, Aug. 10, 1864, at Chesapeake, Md.

John H. Briggs, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Milo E. Burbey, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

William Barrett, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

George Bowers, enl. Sept. 16, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; wounded Sept. 19, 1864; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Thomas J. Bradt, enl. Sept. 18, 1862.

James Conlan, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Wm. Craig, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died of wounds received at Winchester.

Joseph Cromack, enl. Oct. 15, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died in rebel prison.

Charles P. Cornell, enl. Sept. 21, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; wounded Oct. 19, 1864; transferred.

Lewis Calkins, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. C; died at Fortress Monroe, April, 1862.

Benjamin H. Carr, enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; sergt.; died of wounds, June 12, 1864, at Richmond.

Clark Collins, enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H.

George H. Curreen, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; sergt.

Patrick Cannon, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Philip S. Christy, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Mark Cochran, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James W. Cole, col. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Eugene N. Carroll, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

George Cruise, enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James Cuyler, enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Jared L. Crouch, enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Charles M. Carter, enl. Sept. 3, 1862, 153d Regt., Co. G; sergt.

Hubert Curtiss, enl. Sept. 10, 1862, 153d Regt., Co. G.

Wm. J. Chilson, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F; sergt.; disch. July 25, 1865.

Thomas Craig, enl. Jan. 1, 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

John Crouch, enl. 4th H. Art. Co. D.

Egbert W. Davis, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; sergt.; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Robert N. Delong, enl. Oct. 21, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Joseph R. Day, enl. Oct. 27, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. E; died of fever, Jan. 22, 1862, at Washington.

Benjamin H. Day, enl. Oct. 1861, 77th Regt., Co. E; taken sick; did not join the regiment then.

Truman Deuel, enl. Sept. 23, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; disch. for disability, July 25, 1862; re-enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Stephen Davis, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James Dunk, enl. Aug. 2, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

John Duckett, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Benjamin H. Day, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. D; killed May 3, 1863, at Fredericksburg.

Wesley J. Date, enl. Aug. 21, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Henry C. Delong, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Henry C. Dye, enl. Jan. 4, 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

Robert Delong, enl. Dec. 31, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Henry Davis.

Wm. Eastham, enl. Sept. 19, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Nathan Eldredge, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Alfred Eighmy, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Edward Estabrook, enl. Sept. 1861, 44th Regt., Co. C.

Patrick English, enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Leonard Englehart, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Warren Earl, enl. 77th Regt., Co. E; pro. corp.; trans. to Bat., 77th Regt.; wounded Oct. 19, 1864; disch. July, 1865.

James Emperor, enl. Sept. 1861, 77th Regt., Co. E; wounded; trans. to Vet. Reserve Corps; trans. back; killed May 6, 1864, in the Wilderness.

Schuyler Freeman, enl. Sept. 21, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Wm. D. Freeman, enl. Sept. 19, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Cyrus M. Fay, enl. Nov. 8, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disabled May 6, 1864.

Robert Fox, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; corp.; killed in Florida first belonged to 4th Art.

Andrew J. Freeman, enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

George F. Foster, enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James V. Fogg, enl. Sept. 22, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; taken prisoner May 6, 1864; died in rebel prison.

Herman C. Fowler, enl. Aug. 24, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; died of wounds, July 14, 1864.

Samuel Farnsworth, enl. Nov. 28, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Collins Foster, enl. 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

John Fuller, enl. 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

A.M. Fitzgerald, enl. 1861, 30th N. Y. Inf., Co. F; disch. 1863.

Elenah Gildersleeve, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 2, 1862.

David E. Goffe, enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; served through the war; disch. Dec. 13, 1864.

Gottfried Gleesettle, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 24, 1862.

George T. Graham, enl. Oct. 15, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Oct. 4, 1862.

Justus M. Gilson, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died April 16, 1862, at Alexandria, Va.

Frederick Gleesettle, enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; trans.

James K. Gillespie, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; sergt.

John Greer, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Harley Groesbeck, enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

David Galusha, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Terence Gregg, enl. Sept. 1, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; wounded May 6, 1864; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

John Geoghan, enl. Sept. 6, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; disch. for disability, May 16, 1862.

George R. Goodwin, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 13th Art., Co. F; corp.; pro. sergt.

Dudley Goodwin, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, 13th Art. Co. F; pro. corp.

John Hegeman, enl. July 12, 1862, 88th Illinois, Co. B; pro. sergeant; trans. to 1st U.S. Eng., Nov., 1864; mustered out June 29, 1865.

Chas. Howard, from Regular Army, enl. Dec. 1, 1863, Co. I, 2d Vet. Cav.; sergt.; pro. lieut.; mustered out Nov. 28, 1865; died at Albany, 1875.

Ozias Hewitt.

Clement C. Hill, enl. Sept. 13, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; capt.; resigned July 1, 1862.

Noble G. Hammond, enl. Sept. 13, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; 1st lieut.; resigned July 24, 1862.

Alanson F. Hatch, enl. Sept. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died of disease, Nov. 28, 1862.

Amasa A. Holbrook, enl. Sept. 18, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 24, 1862.

Otis Holbrook, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Jan. 10, 1862, at Washington.

Cornelius S. Huyck, col. Sept. 18, 1861, 77th Regt. Co. B; disch. March 7, 1863.

Edward Hall, enl. Sept. 19, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Dallas Hoyt, enl. Sept. 28, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 23, 1862.

Alexander C. Holmes, enl. Oct. 5, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Nov. 3, 1862.

Wm. H. Hewitt, Jr., enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

James A. Hanna, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Seymour Harris, enl. July 30, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Smith Harlow, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Orrin Hill, enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Wm. B. Horton, enl. Sept., 1861, 44th Regt., Co. B.

John B. Harlow, enl. Sept., 1861, 44th Regt., Co. B.

John M. Hammond, enl. Sept., 1861, 44th Regt., Co. B.

George L. Hayes, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H.

Andrew Hassett, enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Wm. Hall, enl. Dec. 3, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

John Howard, enl. Dec. 26, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Frederick Hope, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Stephen Harris, enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Nicholas Hudson, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

Alva Hickok, enl. Dec. 30, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Wm. H. Hewitt, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Martin Hunter, enl. Dec., 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Thomas Harris, enl. Oct. 1861, 77th Regt., Co. E; pro. corp.; sergt.; sergt.-major; 2d lieut.; 1st lieut.; captain; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.; mustered out July 16, 1865.

George W. Ingalls, enl. Nov. 22, 1861, 4th Heavy Art, Co. D; captain; resigned Feb. 28, 1863.

Edwin R. Ingalls, enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 4th Heavy Art., Co. D.

Benjamin J. Jones, enl. Oct. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H.

Wm. J. Jennings, enl. Aug. 17, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; sergt.; mustered out June 24, 1865; died at Ballston, N.Y., May 1, 1871.

Wm. H. Johnston, enl. Sept. 2, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

James Jermain, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Frederick Keenholtz enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died of wounds May 6, 1864, at Spottsylvania.

Christopher F. Keenholtz, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Oscar Kemp, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Edwin L. Lockwood, enl. Oct. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. E; discharged for disability, Aug. 10, 1862.

George D. Luffman, enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Lewis Lakey, enl. Sept. 1, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; killed May 18, 1864, at Spottsylvania.

Francis Love, enl. Aug. 29, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; died of wounds June 16, 1864.

Matthew Love, enl. Aug. 29, 1861, 177th Regt. Co. H; died of wounds July 14, 1864.

Moses Lewis, enl. Dec. 18, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

John F, Lansing, enl. Nov. 28, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Lewis Lane, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

George LeClear, enl. Dec. 11, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Jesse R. Lewis, enl. 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Wm. Lewis, enl. 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Henry Lowery, enl. Dec. 18, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D; disch. at Petersburg, Dec. 9, 1864.

Joseph Lewis, enl. in sanitary service as hospital steward.

Wallace Morrison, enl. Sept. 30, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.; trans. to U.S. Art., June 25, 1862; disch. in 1866.

John Mitchell, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; wagoner; served through; disch. Dec. 13, 1864.

Alexander Morrison, enl. Sept. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; taken prisoner May 6, 1864; exchanged; disch.

Thomas Mainhood, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 19, 1863.

Alexander Mead, enl. Sept. 11, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. sergt.; trans. to U. S. Colored Troops.

Alexander McIntosh, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt, Co. B; pro. corp.; disch. with regiment, Dee. 13, 1864.

John F. Mosher, enl. Oct. 4, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Aug. 12, 1864, at Middletown, Va.

Frederick Morehouse, enl. Sept. 12, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. March 18, 1863.

John Mosher, enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

George Milham, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Ferdinand Miller, enl. July 30, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James McNab, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Wallace McIntosh, enl. Aug. 13, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

John S. McKnight, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Patrick Murray, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

James B. McLean, enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D; sergt.

E. Wilson Merriman, enl. Dec. 16, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Charles Massey, enl. 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Samuel Massey, enl. 4th H. Art., Co. D.

James C. Milliman.

H.T. Medberry, enl. Feb. 17, 1865, 192d Regt., Co. D; disch. July, 1865.

Robert E. Nelson, enl. Oct. 8, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.; pro. sergt.; 2d lieut.; 1st lieut.; mustered out with regiment, June 27, 1865.

Henry O'Neil, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Oct. 2, 1862, at Fortress Monroe.

Elijah Olmstead, enl. Oct. 22, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H; died of disease, Dec. 24, 1862.

Leonard Osman, enl. Sept. 3, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; lost in action.

John O'Neil, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F; corp.

W.H. Owen, enl. 1861, 77th Regt, Co. H; re-enl. 1863, 5th U.S. Reg. Cav.; sergt.

Charles A. Perry, enl. Sept. 13, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; sergt.; disch. Sept. 25, 1862.

Robert Porter, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.; disch. Jan. 1, 1863; re-enl. 13th Art., Dec. 28, 1863.

Archy Phillips, enl. Sept. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Anson J. Palmateer, enl. Sept. 21, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Jan. 1, 1863.

Alfred Picket, enl. Oct. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. F; disch. for disability, April 28, 1862.

Cyrus Padleford, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Reuben Parkhurst, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Isaac Porter, enl. Dec. 24, 1863, 77th Regt., Co. H; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Charles Pettit, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Asahel W. Potter, enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D; 1st sergt.

Henry Packard, enl. 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Albert J. Reed, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp.; sergt.; wounded; transferred.

Patrick D. Rooney, enl. Oct. 8, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Dec. 10, 1864, at Washington, D.C.

James E. Reed, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Frederick Smith, enl. Sept. 13, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; sergt.; pro. to 1st lieut., July 24, 1862; to capt., June 4, 1863; disch. Sept. 9, 1864.

Benjamin T. Simon, enl. Sept. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; served through; disch. Dec. 13, 1864.

Lafayette Schermerhorn, enl. Sept. 14, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died June 3, 1862, at Gaines' Hill, Va.

Arnold Spicer, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Paul Settle, Jr., enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. June 13, 1862.

Charles Shiegel, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

John Southwart, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; twice wounded, May 6 and Oct. 16, 1864.

Simeon Sill, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Lorenzo Smith, enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Philip Schaffer, enl. Aug. 20, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Elijah Sherman, enl. July 31, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Edward C. Slocum, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Thomas S. Stairs, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

John P. Staples, enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

John G. Sternbaur, enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Harris T. Slocum, enl. Dec. 9, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Benjamin Severance, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Martin V. Sheffer, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art, Co. D.

Hiram Sweet, Jr., enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Charles H. Sullivan, enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Horace Salisbury, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Hiram P. Sherman, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Darius Shill, enl. Jan. 29, 1863, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Tobias Salisbury, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Charles Searles, enl. 1861, 13th H. Art., Co. F.

Zagar Strong, enl. Oct. 1861, 77th Regt.; killed at Fredericksburg, Va.

Gideon A. Tripp, enl. Sept. 13, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; 1st sergt.; disch. Oct. 31, 1862.

Flavius A. Titus, enl. Sept. 23, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.

Ira Tripp, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died in rebel prison.

James D. Thompson, enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; corp.

George W. Trumble, enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C; musician.

Royal M. Tenny, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; transferred to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Ephraim Tiff, enl. Sept. 16, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. B; wounded May 10, 1864; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Isaac Thorp, enl. Aug. 14, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Miletus Taft, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Sandy R. Van Steenbergh, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; corp.; disch June 26, 1862.

Asa Van Dye, enl, Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. May 7, 1862.

George Van Dyke, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Dec. 5, 1862.

Wm. R. Van Arnum, enl. Sept. 21, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Nov. 8, 1862.

Jacob H. Van Arnum, enl. Sept. 21, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. Nov. 20, 1862.

John H. Van Steenbergh, enl. Oct. 5, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; detailed for detached service, June 13, 1863.

Michael Van Horn, enl. Sept. 18, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. H.

George L. Van Steenbergh, enl. Aug. 6, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James E. Webster, enl. Sept. 27, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died Aug. 1862.

Joseph S. Wayne, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; died June 9, 1862, at Gaines' Hill, Va.

Edmund Williams, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; transferred.

George M. Wood, enl. Sept. 18, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; pro. corp., May 13, 1864; disch. with the regiment, Dec. 13, 1864.

Horace Weaver, enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. May 7, 1862.

Samuel H. Weldon, enl. Oct. 4, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Datus E. Wilbur, enl. Oct. 8, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B; disch. with the regiment, Dec. 13, 1864.

James M. Wood, enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

James A. Wager, enl. Aug. 4, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

Eugene Werner, enl. Sept. 9, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. H; trans. to Co. A.

Jeremiah Wayes, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Albert L. Wood, enl. Aug. 20, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Norman Wood, enl. Aug. 20, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Charles F. Wait, enl. July 30, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Isaac Warn, enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. I.

Albert A. Weatherwax, enl. Sept. 6, 1862, 153d Regt., Co. G; sergt.

John Walls, enl. Nov. 28, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D; corp.

Alonzo M. Weatherwax, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D.

Wm. Weatherwax, enl. Nov. 24, 1861, 4th H. Art., Co. D; pro. sergt.; served through; disch. Dec. 18, 1864.

Wm. Webb, enl. Dec. 26, 1861, 13th Art., Co. F.

John R. Wilbur, enl. Dec. 18, 1863, 13th Art., Co. F.

Atwood Wilbur, enl. 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

Lee Whalen, enl. 1864, 13th Art., Co. F.

Daniel Webster, enl. April 28, 1861, 30th Regt., Co. F; served time; disch. June 1, 1863; re-enl. July 16, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. I; sergt.; wounded; disch. Sept. 28, 1865.

George Webster, enl. Aug. 4, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. I; musician; disch. Nov. 28, 1865.

Harvey Young, enl. Sept. 17, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. B.

Waldo Young, enl. Aug. 7. 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

HARLOW VAN OSTRAND

 

Portrait of Harlow Van Ostrand

 

was born in Milton, Saratoga Co., December 12, 1817. His father, David Van Ostrand, was among the early settlers in the county, and came from Connecticut soon after the Revolution.

The subject of this sketch was brought up to the mercantile business, commencing when he was fourteen years of age as clerk in the store of Frink & Kellogg, at Milton Centre. Subsequently he carried on a large business at that place, and in 1849 moved to Rock City Falls, where he built the store known as the "Com-oddity Rooms."

He was the first and only postmaster since the establishment of the office at Rock City Falls, in 1849. For many years he was book-keeper for Messrs. Kilmer & Son, extensive paper-manufacturers. His son Henry succeeds him in that position, while the subject of this sketch, whose health is much improved, attends the post-office and his "com-oddity rooms."

He was married September 15, 1839, to Eleanore, daughter of Timothy Tallman. They have seven children now living, two sons and five daughters. Mr. V. has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church for more than forty years.

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ISAIAH BLOOD

 

Residence of the late Isaiah Blood (with portrait)

 

was born at Ballston, Saratoga County, Feb. 13, 1810. His father, Sylvester Blood, was a manufacturer of scythes, a business which he established in the first decade of the present century, two miles south of Ballston Spa. In 1824, with a view of enlarging his business, he purchased the valuable water-power on the Kayadrossera creek, which was called the "Hollow," and is now known as "Bloodville," and carried on the business at that place as well as at the old stand.

In 1831 the subject of this sketch was married to Miss Jane E. Gates, of Ballston, - whose prudent management and wise counsel contributed largely to his success, - and soon after formed a copartnership with his father, and moved to the "Hollow," and took charge of the works at that place. In 1837 he bought out his father, and by strict attention to business was enabled in a few years to enlarge his establishment to its present capacity, including the additional business of manufacturing axes upon the next privilege below. Through this he succeeded in amassing a large fortune. He was a man of remarkable energy; his capacity for the rapid transaction of business was marvelous, and whatever he did was well done.

Mr. Blood was born and educated a Democrat, and always adhered to that faith. His début in politics was in 1847, when he was elected supervisor of the Whig town of Milton. In 1851 he was elected member of Assembly from the First Assembly district of Saratoga County, in the spring of 1859 again supervisor of Milton, and in the fall of that year a senator from the Fifteenth district. In 1869 he was again elected to that position, and died before the expiration of his term, to wit, on the 29th of November, 1870.

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Residence of Isaac Nash (with portraits)

Residence of Isaac H. Johnson

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